Posts Tagged ‘gear’

Polaroid “Dua” Flashes: Designed for Both Photo and Video

At the Photo Plus Expo happening in NYC right now, Polaroid is showing off its new Dua Flash, a flash unit that also packs a strong LED light source for video recording. They’re already available for both Canon and Nikon DSLRs on Amazon, and cost between $160 and $200.

(via Steve’s Digicams)

Weekend Project: Build a DIY Lensbaby

DIYPhotography has a neat tutorial on how you can build a DIY Lensbaby lens with cheap parts. The ingredients list consists of a macro extension tube, some electric tape, a macro filter set, and a pipe clamp.

Build a Lynny – A DIY Lensbaby [DIYPhotography]

RoundFlash: A Collapsible Ring Flash Adapter That Sets Up Like a Tent

The RoundFlash is a new ring flash adapter that’s lightweight and collapsible. Setting it up from its collapsed state is similar to setting up a tent: simply take the rods and stick them into the holes to expand the adapter.
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The “Leica Gun”: Designed to Shoot Both Animals and Athletes

Here’s a strange (and extremely rare) piece of camera gear: the Leica Telephoto Assembly Rifle. Also known as “the Leica Gun”, it was made for photographers at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin, Germany, and became popular among wildlife and sports photographers during the interwar years. One of them will be auctioned off at the Tamarkin Rare Camera Auction on October 30th, and is expected to fetch up to $100,000.

Who knows, maybe shoulder stocks will make a comeback as a form of image stabilization.

Leica Telephoto Assembly Rifle (via Leica Rumors)

Build a Cheap Ring Light Using Christmas Lights and a Wreath Frame

Videographer Joel Loukus created a continuous ring light source — which he calls the “WreathLight” — using a wreath frame and two strings of Christmas lights. The total cost came out to $24. It’s a cheap and easy way of adding some soft lighting to your portraits.
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Nikon Prices May Increase Next Week Due to New Unilateral Pricing Policy

According to Nikon Rumors, Nikon has introduced a new Unilateral Pricing Policy on DSLR gear sold in the US that will take effect on October 16th. Saying that the policy is “designed to allow customers to make purchasing decisions based on service provided and not have to worry about hunting for a better price”, Nikon plans to withhold sales to any store caught pricing equipment below “national prices” that the company will set for each product.
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DIY GoPro Lens Cap Using a Ping Pong Ball and a Rubber Band

If you have a GoPro or any other compact camera with a constantly exposed lens, you can protect the lens from scratches when it’s not in use by making a cheap DIY lens cap out of a ping pong ball and a rubber band.

Protection for GoPro Camera Lens [Instructables]

Make a Padded Insert to Turn Any Bag into a Camera Bag

Some photographers prefer using ordinary bags with padded inserts to carry their camera gear, both for aesthetic reason and to prevent theft. Instead of buying an insert, you can also make a custom one with some foam, fabric, and velcro. Abi over at vanilla & lace made one to turn her purse into a camera bag after finding that purse-style camera bags can cost up to $300. She also wrote up a helpful tutorial on how you can do the same.

DIY camera purse/bag [vanilla & lace]

How to Make a DIY DSLR Viewfinder

Want a DSLR viewfinder but don’t want to pay big bucks for a professional one? Photojojo has a tutorial on how you can build your own DIY version using a lens from a pair of magnifying reading glasses and some plastic/foam board. It’ll definitely draw some weird looks but hey, it works!

How to Make Your Own DSLR Viewfinder [Photojojo]

Pico Dolly: Pint-Sized Wheels for Cameras

Since we wrote about CineSkates last week, the tripod-on-wheels project has already raised nearly $200,000 in preorders — not bad considering the goal was only $20,000. Today, Emm over at CheesyCam just announced something similar: the Pico Dolly. It’s a tiny portable dolly system for your video-capable camera that lets you capture smooth tracking shots without the hassle of big and expensive equipment. Unlike CineSkates, they’re already shipping — $65 will buy you the dolly itself, and $90 gets you the dolly and an 11-inch friction arm.

Pico Dolly [Photography and Cinema]