Posts Tagged ‘bellows’

Lomography Belair X 6-12 is a Medium Format Camera with AE and Bellows

Just because a camera has bellows doesn’t mean it’s vintage. Just announced today, the new Lomography Belair X 6-12 has bellows as well. It’s a portable medium-format camera that shoots auto-exposed photographs on 6×12 film — the world’s first camera to do so.
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Real Tilt-Shift with a Canon 5D Using a 62-Year-Old Lens and Bellows

Flickr user Alex12Ga turned his Canon 5D Mark II into a DIY digital view camera by mounting a Novar-Anastigmat 75mm f/3.5 lens from 1949 with its original bellows. He mounted the bellows to his camera using an aluminum plate and an EOS mount ring that he salvaged from a broken Sigma lens.
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Experiment with Random Lenses by Making Your Own Bellows

DC Watch has a tutorial on how to make your own bellows on which you can use various lenses (toy binoculars, magnifying glass, etc…). Print out the PDF template, then follow the video tutorial above to get started. Here’s a Google Translated version of the tutorial.

Bellows Lens Toy (via Nikon Rumors via Foto Actualidad)

90-Year-Old Pocket Kodak Lens and a Homemade Bellows

Remember the 102-year-old lens experiment we shared a week ago? Daire Quinlan did something similar — he combined his grandfather’s 6×9 Pocket Kodak lens from 1920 (90 years ago) with homemade bellows to create his own tilt-shift lens to play with. Unlike Timur Civan, who used his 102-year-old lens on a 5D Mark II, Quinlan used his frankenlens with a Nikon film camera.
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Accordion Obscura is a Photo and Music Geek Chimera

Accordion Obscura is a sculpture by Andrew Lewicki that mashes together an accordion keyboard and the front of a 4×5 large format camera, joined together with the part they share — bellows. The result is a strange piece of equipment that would certainly cause weird looks if the thing were actually used on the street, though making the setup usable is a whole nother story.


Image credit: Photograph by Andrew Lewicki and used with permission