PetaPixel

Understanding Aperture: Why Shooting Wide Open Isn’t Always the Best Choice

When you drop hundreds or thousands of dollars on a new piece of fast glass, it’s natural to want to shoot it wide-open until the focusing ring falls off. But, the idea that for all portraits you want to be wide open and for all landscapes you want to be stopped down isn’t true. Here to explain in the above video is photographer Matt Granger.

Aperture

In the four minute video, Granger walks through a number of common situations that photographers run into when approaching photos with the all or nothing aperture mindset. The examples given and knowledge shared may seem basic and monotonous, but it’s a trend far more common than most of us think.

If you’d like to keep up with Granger and his Get Your Gear Out series on YouTube, you can follow his channel here. You can also keep up with him on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.


 
  • bethcwhitehorn

    Start working at home with Google! It’s by-far the best job I’ve had. Last Wednesday I got a brand new BMW since getting a check for $6474 this – 4 weeks past. I began this 8-months ago and immediately was bringing home at least $77 per hour. I work through this link, go to tech tab for work detail

    ✒✒✒✒✒✒ jobs700.Com

    ================================

  • AluKed

    The landscape one is particularly befuddling. I’ve seen countless photographers shooting at f/16 and beyond with nothing close enough in the foreground to justify it.

    I mean, the difference between shooting a 24mm hyperfocal at f/8 and f/22 is that you get, theoretically, about 1m more of foreground in focus. If the camera is on a tripod 1.5m high, level with the horizon, the ground will be completely in focus either way.

  • Lodimup

    Used to call himself ‘that Nikon guy’ weird photographer.

  • Zos Xavius

    I don’t think people realize the effects of diffraction at f16. I’ve seen countless landscape photographers shoot at f16 on crop sensors because that’s how they did it in the film days, so why should it be any different now?

  • D.G. Brown

    I was just at a viewpoint with these amazing wrap-around mountains. I was walking up this path that goes around between different views, taking panos (I was just out for a drive and 23mm on 1.5 crop was the widest I had with me).

    There was this couple that I kept catching up with an waiting for. The wife was doing panos with her cell phone, while the husband had a Rebel with the EF-S 10-22mm on it. I was really confused since the mountains were in sunlight, yet he was using a tripod, so I inquired what the tripod was for. He gave me the “what a noob” look and explained that you have to stop down for landscape photography to make everything in focus, so he needed the stability.

    I could have pointed out that my shots at f/2 (with a similarly-sized sensor) of the same subject were completely in-focus from foreground to infinity. However, I just nodded and went back to taking my pictures since I’m kinda lazy that way :-P

  • maggiejcarter

    Start working at home with Google! It’s by-far the best job I’ve had. Last Wednesday I got a brand new BMW since getting a check for $6474 this – 4 weeks past. I began this 8-months ago and immediately was bringing home at least $77 per hour. I work through this link, go to tech tab for work detail

    ✒✒✒✒✒✒ Jobs7000.Com

    ================================

  • http://www.marcofama.it/ Marco Famà

    Very nice advice, thanks for sharing!

  • James Tarry

    hahaha… some people like to use tripods when there’s really no need to “feeeeeel” like a pro (or look like one), me I need the tripod most of the time just because (and yes even at fast shutter speeds) I have shaky hands and legs, tripod just gives me a little security.