PetaPixel

Making of ‘Watermark’: Documenting the Amazing Aerial Work of Edward Burtynsky

The aerial photography work of Edward Burtynsky is spectacular. So much so that Canadian filmmakers Jennifer Baichwal and Nick de Pencier — the creators of the Burtynsky documentary Manufactured Landscapes — are featuring him in yet another visual stunner called Watermark.

This second feature follows Burtynsky as he captures the “existential interactions around the world with water, in places [people] would normally never see.” From India’s sacred Kumbh Mela pilgrimage to the river deltas in Colorado, we can’t help but agree with Baichwal that “There’s something so cinematic about water.”

The above video, Making Of Watermark, was put together in collaboration with Intel for VICE’s The Creators Project and details some of the story and visuals captured for Watermark.

From a technical standpoint, the film is almost as impressive as the natural wonders that are captured. Using a collection of helicopters and quadcopters in combination with some incredible camera gear, the macro visuals in Watermark are absolutely jaw-dropping, turning massive spans of landscapes and seascapes into fractal-based visuals, where size becomes almost unfathomable.

Below are a collection of still images captured by Burtynsky throughout the project. Be sure to give them a thorough look in addition to watching the Making of Watermark above.

VeronaWalk Naples, Florida, USA, 2012

VeronaWalk Naples, Florida, USA, 2012

Thjorsá River #1, Iceland, 2012

Thjorsá River #1, Iceland, 2012

Xiaolangdi Dam #1 Yellow River, Henan Province, China, 2011

Xiaolangdi Dam #1 Yellow River, Henan Province, China, 2011

Colorado River Delta #2, Near San Felipe, Baja, Mexico, 2011

Colorado River Delta #2, Near San Felipe, Baja, Mexico, 2011

As shared by Baichwal in the video:

The richness of this film was dependent upon the proper use of technology. This film is about allowing you to experience these places. If it opens up your consciousness to make you think about something you take for granted — turning on a tap, having a drink of water, jumping in a lake, having a shower — all these things that we do without thinking about it. If it changes your perspective on that a little bit, then it’s done something; it’s meaningful.

If you’re wondering what “incredible gear” was used in the creation of Watermark, we have you covered. 60-megapixel Hasselblads, a RED EPIC and a yet-to-be-released RED Prototype that is capable of capturing 120fps at 5K were all used to create this feature and the accompanying photographs.

(via VICE)


Image credits: Photographs by Edward Burtynsky, courtesy of The Creators Project


 
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  • Tstoddart

    Edward is also a huge part of the Scotiabank award, one of the biggest photography awards in Canada. He has been such a positive impact on the field of photography around the world.

  • http://www.richardsnotes.org Richard

    I’ve been following Burtynsky for years. He’s incredible: wonderful images, wonderful person, and he uses his photography for good in the world.