PetaPixel

Google Significantly Reduces Google Drive Prices, Tempts You to Jump Into the Cloud

GoogleDriveHeader

Just as local, physical storage has since its inception, cloud storage and its accompanying infrastructures are becoming larger, more robust and cheaper as time goes on. Case in point: this past week, Google decided to bring down its Google Drive cloud storage solution pricing to insanely low prices, while increasing capacity at the same time.

Competing directly with Dropbox, the decision is a pretty obvious attempt to get customers to move over to the Google service. You can see the new price-points in the infographic below. For reference, 100GB used to cost $5/month, 1TB used to cost $50/month and the max was 16TB for $800/month. Now you can go as high as 30TB for only $300/month.

GoogleDrivePricingInfographic

If you were already a paying user of Google Drive, your storage has been updated to reflect the new pricing scheme (not the other way around). And, as has been the case since 2012, your Google Drive storage space still works across Drive, Mail and Google+ Photos.

If the prices interest you and you’d like to take the dive and set up a cloud archive, you can head on over to Google’s sign-up page and select the storage/pricing scheme that suits you best.

Speaking specifically to the use of cloud storage for photography, the only thing inhibiting many of us from keeping all of our photos in the cloud is Internet bandwidth. With 25MB raw files being the norm now for many cameras, it’s still not quite feasible to properly store and access a full shoot worth of photos in and from the cloud.

Take Google Fiber, USB 3.0 and Thunderbolt 2.0 for example. Touted as the fastest Internet available (although availability is extremely slim), Fiber comes in at a bandwidth of 1,000mb/s, approximately 1/5th of what USB 3.0 maxes out at, and around 1/20th of the speed of Thunderbolt 2.0).

So, truth be told, realistic 100% cloud-based storage and access for your photo archive is likely years away. But that doesn’t mean Google’s new, extremely affordable options shouldn’t tempt you to use the cloud in collaboration with local storage. It never hurts to have yet another backup.

(via Google)


 
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  • oldtaku

    Before you dive in, be aware that the Google Drive clients are horrible. Dropbox and Sugarsync will give you far more control

    If you’re only going to do PC sync to cloud (for photo backup, say), it’s barely tolerable for that. Just be aware you can only set A SINGLE FOLDER up to sync. That’s your Drive root, and everything will be mirrored.

    It’s even worse on mobile. You can only choose individual files to be viewed locally, so if you want to download an entire directory of photos for viewing (or mp3s for playing, etc), you will need to select every single photo one at a time and choose ‘Keep local on this device.’

    So probably best to just treat this as cheap bulk backup.

    Or if you’re using Picasa for photo storage then you don’t need to deal with the crummy clients.

  • Will

    Even if this move by Google only encourages Dropbox to be more competitive with their pricing plans then it’s a good thing, in my opinion.

  • Gavin

    I personally work strictly out of my google docs root folder. Instead of using the music,photos,docs,etc folders that windows provides, I keep everything in google drive.

    At least that works best for my scenario. I go between 3 of my own computers (2 pc 1 mac) as well as a few shared ones at my school (as well as my phone). Things like my itunes library are identical on every computer and dont need to worry about where what is saved.

    Given, their service needs some improvement, but this is a good start!

  • superduckz

    I was an unapologetic google fanboy for many years. I loved their services and it all played nice with the rest of the web. I had storage, photos, even ran a few fairly popular bolgs on blogger. All smooth sailing with with no real complaints.

    Then in the span of a year or so they started forcing all my online linked content to be connected to the less than useless POS nobody gives a ###k google plus universe. Christ on a cross what a piece of crap they became. Overnight many thousands of linked picassa images lost their paths. The headaches for connecting the data outside the google universe became ridiculous.

    Now my blogs are independently hosted and run off wordpress and all the images have been moved (and many tediously relinked) to flickr. You can give it away free for all I care but if google thinks they are going to recreate an AOL like cocooned universe in the 21′st century they can go ###k themselves.

  • MarvinB7

    They are becoming hyper-selfish lately. I love Google (loved?) but am getting a little annoyed. The YouTube comments switch is a horrible mess. I don’t even bother anymore. Someone commented on one of my vids and I can’t reply to them. What a hack job.

  • Martin Nilsson

    For mobile I would try this app – https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ttxapps.drivesync

    I have used DropSync from the same company. Allows for full 2-way sync with DropBox with a few more options as well. Such as upload and delete.

    Not sure if the version for Google Drive is as good, but even if it’s only half as good it should beat the native client for sync.

  • Darius Daro

    Fu.. you google. I use my external hard drive

  • Sky

    NSA Approves.

  • http://about.me/jasonbrewer Jason Brewer

    Agreed, I am currently using blogger for my family and photo blog but lately the service has been utter crap with long response times, lock ups and resetting setting to to where different pre-scheduled posts were posting at the same time but different time zones even though setting said CST.

    Also the dynamic templates constantly break.

  • meaghdalena

    Finally! I am not alone in the universe! *weeps* *hugs*

  • oldtaku

    I’ll give that a shot, thanks!