PetaPixel

Humorous Photography Flowchart Helps You Decide Whether or Not to Take a Photo

photoflowchart1

Here’s a little funny to get you through your Sunday afternoon: a flowchart that can help you decide whether or not that photo you’re thinking of taking is actually worth going through with.

The chart was put together by the folks at CLICKitty Cat, who share all sorts of funny cartoons that have to do with the photography world. The flowchart is their most recent creation and they decided to send it our way because they thought you guys might like it.

Here’s the whole chart (click on it to view the full resolution version):

photoflowchart2

We thought it was pretty funny, and not entirely useless either. There are a LOT of steps involved, all of which have to go a certain way, before you say yes and take/share the pic. And you’ll notice that there’s zero-tolerance for pictures of your food — you’ve got to appreciate that.

To see more photography-inspired cartoons, head over to the CLICKitty Cat Tumblr by clicking here.


 
  • C Jacobs

    Epic!

  • http://www.richardsnotes.org Richard

    Great. I hate to link to an illegal flickr upload but it reminded me of this:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/millwood127/108891139/

  • Jeff

    Do you have batteries?

    No

    Sweet, use your awesome film camera that doesn’t need batteries.

  • battlepriest

    You left out the “Does it involve fire spinning?” question.

  • http://www.bobcooleyphoto.com/ bob cooley

    Unfortunately, most film cameras (since the 80’s) still require a battery (at least for the meter)…

  • alealeale ale

    Great except for the watermark thing! There is nothing wrong with nit wanting people to steal your work.

  • alealeale ale

    That’s why you don’t use a meter ;)

  • http://www.bobcooleyphoto.com/ bob cooley

    With film? Yeah, i like my exposures correct ;)

  • StatlerPat

    I think “huge” and “obnoxious” are the operative words. We want to be able to actually see the photograph!

  • Broken Toy Shop

    So, basically, unless you think are the an awesome photographer who can take a better photo than has ever been done before, get a different hobby?

  • http://www.bobcooleyphoto.com/ bob cooley

    You kind of missed the point:

    1) If you have seen it done before but bring nothing new, better or exciting to it, don’t expect others to share your excitement…

    2) If you don’t see that this is sarcastic humor, you need a funny-bone adjustment…

  • noise1010

    Isn’t the “Is it complicated?” step incorrect?

  • Zos Xavius

    Who needs a meter for that? ;)

  • Norshan Nusi

    A camera that can meter itself and doesn’t need a battery?

    Olympus Trip 35

  • Zos Xavius

    The sunny 16 rule? :P

  • Norshan Nusi

    Still applicable.

  • alealeale ale

    Well, do you look at the lcd after every picture? I yes you gotta start learning the bases i’m afraid

  • http://www.bobcooleyphoto.com/ bob cooley

    In fact, no – I don’t look at the LCD at all. I shot film for years, and never had the luxury – now that I shoot digital, I don’t need to – I meter and the exposure are correct – no need to chimp when you know what you are doing…

  • http://www.bobcooleyphoto.com/ bob cooley

    What if its anything but sunny out?

  • alealeale ale

    What do you need a meter for then??

  • http://www.bobcooleyphoto.com/ bob cooley

    To get a correct exposure and optimal image quality in often quickly changing situations. Exposure is physics, not luck. But go ahead, troll on – it’s the ‘cool’ thing to do on the net…

  • alealeale ale

    I think that troll peope, that aren’t is the cool thing on the net and exactly what you’re doing. Your comments don’t make sense because you just said that you metered your exposure by yourself. I don’t see why you’d need a meter more in film that digital.

  • http://www.bobcooleyphoto.com/ bob cooley

    Clearly you don’t have a great command of English, I’m guessing its not your primary language, since you aren’t understanding my comment, or reading what I wrote properly.

  • alealeale ale

    You’re right, it’s not my native language. But where have I made a mistake and how didn’t I well understood your comments?

  • Zos Xavius

    Clearly you missed my tongue firmly lodged in my cheek. A meter is helpful for sure, but clearly photographers got by just fine for over 100 years without one.

  • http://www.bobcooleyphoto.com/ bob cooley

    I did miss the tongue-in-cheek, should have caught that. Photographers have actually been using light meters since the 1840s… so there was a short period in photography where they weren’t used, but its just the very beginning of the artform, and film was a LOT less sensitive back then (there’s not much difference between a 10 minute and a 10 minute 30 second exposure) :)

  • Zos Xavius

    Yeah the exposure errors weren’t nearly as problematic back then with the insanely long exposure times. I didn’t know they actually had meters available since the 1840s. That’s fascinating.