PetaPixel

Photog Combines Aerial Landscapes and Fashion Photos into Amazing Mashups

http://www.josephford.net

Aerial landscape photography and fashion photography hardly go hand-in-hand in most peoples’ minds, but that might change once you’ve taken a look at Joseph Ford‘s uncanny series of Aerial mashups.

The whole series is actually made up of two projects done for two different magazines, but he had no idea he was going to be making mashups when he first brought his Hasselblad digital back with him on assignment in 2011.

“I shot all the aerial images during a couple of advertising jobs in Sicily, Mauritius and Morocco, where I spent several days flying around over all sorts of terrain in a helicopter,” he tells us via email, being sure to praise the skill of his helicopter pilots.

“I showed the aerial pictures to a couple of friends, Stephanie Buisseret (art director) and Mario Faundez (stylist) at Paris streetwear magazine WAD, and we came up with the idea of shooting a series mixing fashion and landscapes.”

Those photos, which make up the first five photographs in the Aerial series, were selected for the Association of Photographers Awards in the UK, and even garnered an Honorable Mention in the International Photography Awards.

It wasn’t until a few months ago that the rest of the pictures were made, when Süddeutsche Zeitung Magazin got in touch with Ford to see if he could do something similar with them. In all the series now consists of 10 mind-blowing mashups, each of them impressive in its own right:

http://www.josephford.net

http://www.josephford.net

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http://www.josephford.net

190_SZ_Boxers_14_Joseph_Ford

http://www.josephford.net

http://www.josephford.net

190_SZ_Dunes_19_Joseph_Ford

http://www.josephford.net

As you might imagine, creating these photographs was no easy feat. Although they selected landscapes and clothes that would go well together, the clothes had to be lit and set up just right to match the landscapes.

With the exception of some color balance tweaks, there was almost no retouching done to the images at all. But getting these kinds of results in camera meant that some of the fashion photos took as long as 12 hours to properly set up and shoot.

To see more of Ford’s work, be sure to head over to his website — which recently had to receive a massive back-end overhaul thanks to the amount of traffic the Aerials series has brought in — by clicking here.

(via Colossal)


Image credits: Photographs © Joseph Ford 2011-13 and used with permission. All rights reserved.


 
  • Zet

    “Amazing”.

  • Joe

    best evar!

  • Joey Duncan

    What highschool class did this again? Art Discovery? Intro to photography? Into to oblique drawing?

  • Jesse

    You can’t possibly be belittling this project. Unless you did something of this magnitude at a high school level, in which case i yield.

  • Aiden

    I applaud the creativity here. Not sure if they’re “amazing” or whatever but they’re certainly interesting.

  • Joey Duncan

    How is this to any magnitude? “The whole series is actually made up of two projects done for two different magazines,”

    He had a TON of photos lying around and decided to put a bunch of them together, I’m not saying he didn’t put work into it, because obviously he did. but there is nothing mesmerizing about this, and there is certainly nothing educated about it. It’s simply following lines and adhering to proper-similar pastel colors. Yes, there is a lot of effort involved in finding photos that work but no more knowledge or skill went into this than you would have done in college. Had they blended from one photo to the next I would have been wow’d, but they don’t they simple follow similar angles and colors.

  • Jose Escobar

    Haters gonna hate.

  • eni turkeshi imagery

    smart

  • Joe

    ^^ I guess when you have nothing of substance to say you can fall back on this gem.

    I actually did something very similar to this in a college night school course I took on photography when I was in my early twenties. We ended up incorporating zippers and clothing accessories into street scenes. It was fun and much harder to pull of than placing two pictures together.

  • Jose Escobar

    “ok”

  • Gman

    “mind-blowing”

  • kassim

    Wow, this is art.

  • yopyop

    Too bad there is no “awesome” bee in it.

  • Shayke

    pixplit dot com!

  • http://www.eriklaurikulo.se/ Erik Lauri Kulo

    May I return the favorable phrase to you: hater’s gonna hate.

  • MORIKAMI

    Joey you are an idiot..

  • LG

    Joey is spot on! Its a very sub standard, basic project. No depth whatsoever…

  • MikeAlgar42

    A lot better than I expected. The only one I didn’t really understand the join was the overshot of the desert and the wavy cardigan.

  • 773metric

    It’s a sad day when you read a post like this, see the photos and then know very well that in the comments someone will wheel out the old ‘WHAT’S THE POINT?’ or ‘BORING’ lines, but bam, here it is.

    In the interests of dialogue, what sort of photography do you enjoy, Joey? It’s a genuine question.

  • mohawk

    Creativity

  • Frederick

    He’s making a point and backing it up.
    Your just calling people names like a child. Bravo. Way to rise above.

  • http://www.KenFlan.com/ Ken

    Apparently not the school of Joey Duncan. We should all be so lucky.

  • Jose Escobar

    No apostrophe bro.

  • Christian DeBaun

    It’s amazing how many people here, don’t read the ACTUAL articles, they just skim through the images, make a snap judgement, and throw out some weapons-grade hate.

    From the article:

    “Those photos, which make up the first five photographs in the Aerial series, were selected for the Association of Photographers Awards in the UK, and even garnered an Honorable Mention in the International Photography Awards.”

    I think a tremendous amount of work went into creating these. Do they excite me? Maybe not a lot, because it’s simply not my thing. But I can see the effort that was made, and I applaud that.

  • Guest

    The “What’s the point of this” line. What’s the point of you posting your comment? It achieves nothing but to convey a message or an idea that YOU think is important.

    Believe it or not, that’s what this photographer was doing as well. Except his attempt is a positive one. Yours is simply demeaning.

    Wake up to yourself.

  • Chris

    The “What’s the point of this” line. What’s the point of you posting your comment? It achieves nothing but to convey a message or an idea that YOU think is important.

    Believe it or not, that’s what this photographer was doing as well. Except his attempt is a positive one. Yours is simply demeaning.

  • http://www.eriklaurikulo.se/ Erik Lauri Kulo

    Thanks!

  • Paul Aguilar

    Fantastic work! and I really dig the fashion as well, where to buy???

  • Anonymoused

    Agree to disagree. This is one of the few inspiring and ingenious projects I’ve seen in a while. The way everything so seamlessly pieces together, the originality, and the fact that all I can think is “Wow, this is actually really awesome,” makes me love this. I love how he can tie these two very different photographic “genres” together. The thought put into matching shapes, colors, small details.. I don’t know exactly WHAT it is I love so much about this project, but I do love it.