PetaPixel

‘Kiss in Times Square’ Photo and Camera Both Up for Auction at WestLicht

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At the end of May, a signed copy of one of the most iconic photos ever taken, and the camera that took it, will both go on sale at the WestLicht Photographica Auction. The photo is a signed print of the iconic V-J Day “Kiss in Times Square” photograph taken by Alfred Eisenstaedt, and the camera is the Leica IIIa rangefinder that he used right up until the day he died.

Both items will go up on the auction block at the end of May in Vienna, Austria, with the signed photo going first on May 24th, and the camera following one day later. Here’s a look at both items:

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The photo is a 17.5 x 12 in print, signed on the back, and is expected to fetch between $20,900 and $23,500. The camera, with its Summitar 2/5cm lens and the original VIOOH viewfinder, on the other hand, is expected to go for between $26,100 and $32,700. However, if recent trends in photography auctions continue, both items should blow those expectations way out of the water.

To follow the auctions and see more images of Eisenstaedt’s Leica — or if you can afford to actually place a bid on either of these items — head over to the WestLicht website by clicking here.

(via Imaging Resource)


 
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  • SpaceMan

    Whoever buys this Leica I hope they continue to use it and have fun with it. Odds are it will be vacuum wrapped and will never see daylight again

  • madmax

    This has a lot more sense than that stupid Eggleston´s tricycle picture…

  • http://www.facebook.com/igor.kennn Igor Ken

    what a piece of photographic history!

  • DamianM

    Sorry you don’t understand the image and its representation (Egglestons) and go for the sensational and easy to understand.

    I’m not dissing the photographer. I just don’t understand why nobody likes Eggleston’s image without a proper intelligent reason.

  • DamianM

    nope, vacuum wrapped and ready to die in storage.