PetaPixel

London Olympics’ Photo Policy Not as Draconian as It Sounds

Amateur Photographer sparked an outcry among photographers this past Tuesday after it pointed out a section in the London Olympics’ ticketholder policies that states:

Images, video and sound recordings of the Games taken by a Ticket Holder cannot be used for any purpose other than for private and domestic purposes and a Ticket Holder may not license, broadcast or publish video and/or sound recordings, including on social networking websites and the internet more generally, and may not exploit images, video and/or sound recordings for commercial purposes under any circumstances, whether on the internet or otherwise, or make them available to third parties for commercial purposes.

Shortly after we reported on the story yesterday, a spokesman for the Olympics organizing committee (Locog) issued a response stating that they “are not looking to stop private individuals from posting photographs on social networks,” and that the intent is to prevent photos being used for commercial purposes. He did, however, acknowledge that the wording is unclear, saying that it will likely be clarified when tickets are mailed.

(via Amateur Photographer via TheDigitalVisual)


Image credits: Image by London 2012


 
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  • http://www.facebook.com/rick020200 Rick Bennett

    Wait,  we “are not looking to stop private individuals from posting photographs on social networks” but “a Ticket Holder may not license, broadcast or publish video and/or sound recordings, including on social networking websites”. So, seriously, “we said that, but we didn’t mean that.” Dumbasses.

  • mythbuster

    “be clarified when tickets are mailed” so you can´t return tickets when you know the only thing you can do with your pics in case they let you get one … Besides, likely you shall not be able to enter with a pro-like camera (a big one). This is only business and a dirty one. If they don´t sell enough tickets, next time this policy could change.

  • http://twitter.com/Daveybot Dave Morris

    No, their policy is still EXACTLY as draconian as it sounds until they change it, IN WRITING. All that’s happened here is that they’ve written a terrible policy, had it discovered, then told us they don’t really mean it.

    They could easily have used the terms ‘non-commercial’ in their policy, somewhere, but they didn’t. It isn’t an accident, and it isn’t even remotely unclear. Rather than cover their asses with press releases and talk, they need to CHANGE THEIR POLICY.

  • Roy

    you forgot to include “for commercial purposes”

  • Gdsg

    If you put the photo’s on facebook we wont seu , but if we dont like you we always can seu you!

  • David Ritchie

    *sue

  • JacobPhoto

    Read again.

    IOC – “are not looking to stop private individuals from posting photographs on social networks”

    Ticket holder disclaimer – “a Ticket Holder may not license, broadcast or publish video and/or sound recordings, including on social networking websites”

    Notice that PHOTOGRAPHS isn’t included in the second statement.

    video / audio broadcast rights are big business for the IOC. NBC paid $2.2B for exclusive US broadcast rights to the 2010 winter and 2012 summer olympics. Therefore, the IOC doesn’t want someone streaming an event from their phone to an online video site or social network, possibly undermining the broadcast rights that were sold.

    It’s a fair request.

  • http://twitter.com/philpem Phil Pemberton

    Last I heard, they’d already sold nearly all the tickets… aside from a couple of last-minute and cancelled tickets AIUI.

  • Tzctplus -

     I am sure seuing you is worst….