PetaPixel

How National Geographic Photography Worked 20 Years Ago

Ever wonder how the photographs found on the pages of National Geographic come together? Here’s a fascinating behind-the-scenes video showing how the images of the 1992 cover story titled “The Sense Of Sight” — photographed by Joe McNally — were shot, edited, and arranged. McNally writes,

And changes. Man, is that an understatement. High res digital cameras have replaced film cameras. Hard drives store pictures, not little yellow boxes. Kodak’s stopped making carousel projectors. Photographers go to the magazine far less often, given digital transmission. Ties and jackets are seen less frequently.

But, the main mission, over time, has remained. Tell a good story in pictures. The major components–photographer, picture editor, designer, magazine editor–are all still in place, and the interplay among them is ongoing and largely unchanged.

The next time you pick up an issue of National Geographic and are tempted to flippantly flip through the images, consider these crazy facts: the 40 page/40 picture story took roughly a year to create from idea to completion and required 1200 rolls of film shot during 6 months of field work!

(via Joe McNally)


 
  • Anonymous

    ” flippantly flip  ”

    Love it!!

  • Jan

    kewl stuff! but what has jerry springer to do with this?

  • J_dyno

    Back in the days when Geographic gave a photographer 6 months to complete a project.  Now they give you 6 days. 

  • Vctkw

    Already saw this here months ago….