• Facebook

    500 K / likes

  • Twitter

    1 M / followers

Images Made by Cutting and Weaving Two Prints Together

Comment

G_unframed_web_1024x1024

In some sense, you could call photographer Jason Chen‘s latest work multiple exposures. Except that, instead of capturing two images on a single frame of film, he’s literally weaving together two prints in a fascinating exploration of “time, movement, process, and mutation.”

These weaved portraits—archival pigment prints that are cut and woven together by hand—are described at Chen’s Paradigm Gallery + Studio as, “decisive moments that trail off into larger stories.”

Although woven photography is not itself a new idea, this medium is new for Chen, who spent years working with dry plate tintypes. Below is a selection of his woven portraits, some zoomed in, others shown in the frame so you can see what these are like at exhibition:

K_unframed_web_1024x1024

b15b35dee191c365bce9339ed2c9ac9d1d9b44bd_1024x1024

G_iii_unframed_web_1024x1024

S_unframed_web_1024x1024

9d084f6b43063d1ba626ed81c960b2c2c06af06b_1024x1024

A_unframed_web_1024x1024

1eac95a25bf4a9f75246d8b04ad87083b1424a6d_1024x1024

efd97ffa9ba2c6b92ad863c7c3ec228ab2b536c5_1024x1024

To see more Chen’s woven work, visit his page at Paradigm. And if you want to explore the other artwork being shown currently as part of Paradigm Gallery + Studio’s exhibition “Portrait,” click here.

(via Colossal)


Image credits: Photographs by Jason Chen and used with permission.

Comment