Posts Tagged ‘advertisement’

Nikon D600 Spotted in an Italian Camera Dealer Advertisement

Dutch website Focus Media published this reader photo of an Italian camera dealer ad showing the Nikon D600 — a camera that doesn’t officially exist yet. This new sighting comes after first photos of the entry-level full-frame camera leaked back in June.
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Only the Human Eye Focuses Faster

Check out this blast from the past: it’s a 1986 commercial for the Minolta Maxxum 7000.

The Minolta 7000 was the first successful auto focus SLR using a motor integrated in the camera body. It was released in 1985 together with 11 lenses, 2 flashguns and a complete lineup of accessories. The 7000 featured one AF-sensor, shutter speeds of 1/2000 to 30 seconds, flashsync speed of 1/100s, exposure compensation of +-4EV in 0.5 exposure steps, center-weighted lightmetering and two frames per second film advance. [#]

The AF system was marketed as Maxxum in North America and Alpha (α) in Asia. When Sony acquired Konica Minolta in 2006, it kept the Alpha brand name for its new DSLR system, which used the old Minolta lens mount. Hence, Sony Alpha DSLRs.

Creepy Portraits of Women Showing the Thatcher Effect

Dutch photographers Anuschka Blommers and Niels Schumm shot a series of photographs for a Dove ad campaign that uses the Thatcher effect for some stealthy creepiness. The effect is created by flipping a portrait upside down while keeping the eyes and/or mouth right side up. The human brain has a difficult time detecting these subtle “local” changes, and the portraits may look normal until you see them flipped. Try turning your monitor or head to look at these images upside down.
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A Beautiful 1 Minute Story Told Through 873 Stock Photographs

From Love to Bingo in 873 Images is an amazing short film created by AlmapBBDO to advertise Getty Images. The team spent 6 months sifting through 5,000 Getty stock photographs to create this beautiful 1-minute story that shows 873 images at 15 images per second. And you thought flipping through your own personal photo archives was difficult…

The World’s Most Downloaded Man

This is probably the strangest and most awkward thing you’ll see today. It’s a short 5-minute video titled “The World’s Most Downloaded Man” that chronicles photographer Fernado Martins’ journey to meet Jesper Bruun, the world’s best-selling stock photography model. It’s actually part of a marketing effort for Martins’ photo studio, Câmera Clara Photography Studio in Brazil. For some strange reason the video is going viral online, despite the fact that Yuri Arcurs (the world’s top selling microstock photographer who works with Bruun) has come forward to say that Bruun isn’t actually the world’s top selling model. The whole thing doesn’t make much sense to us — kinda like this performance art piece.

(via PopPhoto)

Filmmaker Spends Nike Ad Budget on a Trip Around the World

Filmmaker Casey Neistat (whose peanut butter jar lens fix we featured recently) was recently commissioned by Nike to create an advertisement for its new FuelBand. Instead of spending it on a standard ad, he decided to “go rogue” and spend the money traveling around the world with his friend Max. They captured video of themselves traveling 34,000 miles across three continents, 13 countries, and 16 cities over a span of 10 days. Neistat states,

We only packed backpacks—they were big backpacks, but one of the rules was we had to have both hands free at all times. That meant no duffels and no rolling bags. We only had underwear and socks, because we each had two cameras, chargers, extra batteries, laptops, and hard drives. That’s the bare minimum, and that takes up a lot of space. We had total redundancy, because if one of us were kidnapped, and never seen again, we had to make sure we could still make the movie.

The resulting video they made has gone viral and will probably reach many more people than a traditional advertisement would have.


Thanks for sending in the tip, Simone!

Controversial French Ad Campaign for Photographers’ Rights

French photographers organization Union des Photographes Professionnels (UPP) launched a controversial new advertising campaign this week, speaking out against the use of photographs without proper permission and/or payment. The ad reads: “Each day, a photographer’s work is used without his consent”. A spokesperson for UPP states,

It’s obvious that professional photographers are not being listened to. So, for the first time, we’re speaking to the photographic community with an image. We hope to raise awareness among the public, as well as the media and the government, about photographers’ problems. Each day, photographers are faced with decreasing rates. They are forced to compete against image libraries that are offering vile prices. These practices are infringing on photographers’ moral rights.

In a blog post, the organization adds, “Each day, photographers risk their lives to allow us to stay informed. And each day, photographers continue to be dealt with as if they weren’t producing anything. […] With this image, we want to show the violent and disrespectful economic reality that photographers have to deal with.”

(via UPP via BJP via The Click )

Fauxtographor: A Prescription Drug Commercial Parody

Here’s a clever parody of the drug commercials you see on TV. It’s marketing “Fauxtographor”, prescription pills geared towards helping photographers become more creative and successful in their work.

(via Fstoppers)

Photos of Falling Chocolate Confections Created Without CGI

Japan-based art collective NAM shot this series of advertisements showing gravity-defying chocolate confections. What’s interesting about the concept is that they decided to do everything without digital trickery, opting instead to hang the various foods from thin strings.
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Cloaking a Car Using LEDs and a Canon 5D Mark II

For a recent advertising campaign to bring attention to its hydrogen-powered cars, Mercedes-Benz decided to make a car “invisible” by creating a novel cloaking device using LEDs and a Canon 5D Mark II. One side of the car was covered with several mats of LEDs that display what the DSLR sees on the other side.

(via Photoxels)