PetaPixel

The Image, Deconstructed: Offering Insight Into Quality Photojournalism

The Image Deconstructed

We love seeing and hearing about the process of creating an image. The motivation behind a photo combined with a glimpse at how it was shot can be both inspirational and educational, which is a powerful combo.

But while there are plenty of behind the scenes videos and articles dedicated to studio photography, one of the genres you don’t get to hear as much about is photojournalism. That’s where The Image, Deconstructed website comes in.

The Image, Deconstructed is a blog that posts a new photo/interview each week, breaking down the mental, psychological approach the photographer took towards capturing that particular moment. Basically, it’s photojournalists interviewing other photojournalists, and the work featured on the site thus far is superb.

[The site's] primary goal is to provide a collective insight to the psychology of photojournalism and serve as a resource for a purposeful approach to photography.

The Image Deconstructed 2

The website is set up as a non-profit and is purely volunteer-based, with a small team making sure things stay on track and photographs get covered. The aesthetics and presentation are still a bit rough around the edges, but you forget all that once you jump into an interview with, say, Boston Bombing photographer John Tlumacki or award-winning wildlife photographer Paul Souders.

If you’re interested in photojournalism or would like to find out more about how quality photojournalism comes together, I highly suggest you head on over and spend some quality time at The Image, Deconstructed. There’s already a strong archive of images and interviews, with plenty more to come.


 
  • py

    Great website. Interesting to see how some of the shots came together.

  • Omar Salgado

    That’s right: great website. But I wouldn’t call it for a deconstruction of the image. It is more of a story teller and a behind the scenes than an approach to reorganise the image content into a new cognitive, perceptual and reflexive view. Deconstruction always calls for cognitive confrontation of the past, present and future.