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Adobe Admits to Being Hacked, 2.9M User Accounts Compromised

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Adobe users who have purchased a product or signed up for Creative Cloud recently beware. According to Adobe’s website, the company’s servers were hacked “very recently,” and the attackers made away with customer information from 2.9 million Adobe accounts, as well as source code for a few Adobe products.

Adobe isn’t disclosing when exactly this happened, but the company is admitting that the hackers managed to pull “customer IDs, encrypted passwords… names, encrypted credit or debit card numbers, expiration dates, and other information relating to customer orders” from some 2.9 million users’ accounts — Adobe is in the process of notifying affected customers by email.photoshopcc

The good news (if you can call it that) is that Adobe doesn’t believe the hackers got any decrypted financial information, so even though we suggest Adobe CC subscribers keep a closer eye on their bank and CC accounts over the next few weeks, you should be ok.

Regardless, Adobe still isn’t willing to take any chances where customer info is concerned. In addition to working with financial institutions to protect customers’ accounts, the company is also resetting all Adobe ID passwords affected.

Those whose financial info was compromised will also receive a letter detailing steps they might take to help protect themselves, as well as one year of free credit monitoring so you can be sure nothing fishy is going on.

Adobe CC Splash logoThe source code breach, which Adobe believes might have been related, has less to do with us photographic types. Apparently the cyber thieves stole source code from “Acrobat, ColdFusion, ColdFusion Builder and other Adobe products.”

Thankfully, this particular breach requires no further action as Adobe “[is] not aware of any specific increased risk to customers as a result of this incident.” We’ll call that the silver lining.

For more info on either security breach, head over to the Adobe blog by clicking here (customer info theft) or here (source code theft). As we mentioned above, if you were affected by the hack, you should shortly (if you haven’t already) receive an e-mail from Adobe notifying you.