PetaPixel

Famous Places Around the World Turned Into Miniature Scenes

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New York-based photographer Richard Silver is a passionate traveler, and his primary goal as an artist is to share his life experiences by creating beautiful photographs during his travels. Rather than shoot traditional photos, he uses techniques such as tilt shift, HDR, panorama, and time-slice in order to capture the world in eye-catching ways. Last year we shared his time-slice photos of NYC, which showed day turning into night in single photos.

Another major project he has been working on is called “Tilt Shift.” He has been photographing some of the world’s most famous locations and turning them into miniature scenes.

The project contains photos snapped in locations ranging from the famous structures of Machu Picchu (as seen above) to runners streaming down a road during the New York Marathon.

Silver says, “People always ask me, How do I make people look so small or why do I make people look so small? Simple, we are!” Thus, his goal with the project is to “give the viewer a new way of seeing themselves and their place in the world.”

The photographer tells us he was inspired by the tilt-shift work of Italian photographer Olivo Barbieri. However, instead of using an actual tilt-shift lens, Silver shot “normal” photographs and then applied an artificial shallow depth of field to the images using Photoshop during post-processing.

“I appreciate the freedom that digital gives me especially with this ongoing project,” he says.

So far, Silver has already visited all 7 New Wonders of the World (one of the lists, at least), and has applied this tilt-shift style to all of them.

The US Open in New York City

The US Open in New York City

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge in New York City

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge in New York City

Ha Long Bay, Vietnam

Ha Long Bay, Vietnam

Acropolis

Acropolis

Ahu Tangariki

Ahu Tangariki

Palm Islands in Dubai

Palm Islands in Dubai

The White House in Washington, DC

The White House in Washington, DC

The World Trade Center Memorial

The World Trade Center Memorial

The Western Wall in the Old City of Jerusalem

The Western Wall in the Old City of Jerusalem

Colesium

Colesium

The Great Wall of China

The Great Wall of China

Teotihuacan, Mexico

Teotihuacan, Mexico

Brooklyn Bridge

Brooklyn Bridge

Roman ruins

Roman ruins

The New York Marathon in 2011

The New York Marathon in 2011

Balloon Fiesta in Albuquerque, New Mexico

Balloon Fiesta in Albuquerque, New Mexico

Zocalo, Mexico

Zocalo, Mexico

Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, Turkey

Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, Turkey

Snow walkers in Iceland

Snow walkers in Iceland

Silver’s photographs are now being exhibited in galleries located in many of the countries he has visited (over 50 of them around the world).

You can find more photographs from this series over on Silver’s website.


Image credits: Photographs by Richard Silver and used with permission


 
  • http://www.facebook.com/nathanblaney Nathan Blaney

    Are these supposed to be interesting simply because they are famous locations? The tilt shift technique is well worn and certainly not something he invented… anyone can do this. Its as common and overdone as HDR. Not that these aren’t nice photos – they’re just unremarkable.

  • http://www.facebook.com/sevenforest Bart van der Horst

    If you do this you have to do it well and not just blurr 3/4 of your picture. It would have better to seen them without the blurr

  • H Sterling Cross

    Agreed. They’re not even shot with a tilt-shift lens… Just regular photos with the Field Blur filter applied in Ps.

  • https://twitter.com/adamhowardcross Adam Cross

    In the majority of these photographs the tilt-shift “miniature” effect simply fails. The Brooklyn Bridge and Verrazano-Narrows Bridge are the only images that seem to fit the miniature style well. and these are being exhibited in galleries?…

  • JB

    Is this a joke? Petapixel, stop promoting my neighbour’s amateur photography!

  • http://www.michaelpalmer.com/ Michael Palmer

    Zzzzzzzz……

  • http://www.facebook.com/abhinav7557 Abhinav Sagar

    trueee

  • Faux Toe

    Ouch. Some of the tilt-shift failed epically. The blurring of the top half of an object with the middle half of the object still clear despite both half of the object being at the same distance away. This is especially bad in the pics of the Roman ruins, Colosseum, and Acropolis.

  • Lance B.

    I like them.

  • tttulio

    Please stop. It looks crap.
    Real T+S was a fad, but this doesn’t even look like real T+S .

    Every point and shoot camera has this effect these days.

  • http://www.facebook.com/igor.kennn Igor Ken

    some of the pictures don’t have the right TS effect that makes the world look like a miniature.

  • CDM

    Maybe you should go buy a point and shoot camera.

  • http://www.facebook.com/jonathan.maniago Jonathan Maniago

    Oh, the irony of digital post-processing. Use focus stacking for the sharpest macro shots, then throw in some cheap macro effect on your landscapes.

  • http://www.foggodyssey.com/ foggodyssey

    If you want to see this affect done correctly from places around the world, check out this article then: http://travelingcanucks.com/2011/10/miniature-photos-from-around-the-world/

    It’s 10x better then what the guy above did (which I don’t want to beat his work up but it’s just blahhh to look at and not done very well).

  • klsjsdj

    lol… they look like crap.
    strange focus planes some have….

  • http://www.facebook.com/john.sluder John Sluder

    An extremely over used “technique”, the effect only degrades the base images. If used subtly it might work better but it was used with a 25 lbs sledge hammer..

  • Sabrunto

    This should have been featured as an example of how not to do TS in photoshop. There’s ZERO understanding from the photographer of the depth of field and TS basics. I’ve seen iPhone TS 1000x times better than this ones.

  • matias

    WTF…

  • Jay

    Looks so artificial.

  • Yonaphoto.com

    I cant stop thinking: You go to iceland… to take these kind of pictures??? “Tilt-shift, the ideal way to turn your tourist-filled pictures into mediocre images!”

  • mooboy

    “People always ask me, How do I make people look so small or why do I make people look so small? Simple, we are!”

    Yet, his sloppily applied tilt shift makes the world seem small, not just the people. So, this fails to meet objective on all levels, not just execution.

    I remember first seeing a tutorial on performing this trick on photos, and instantly trying it out on my photo of the great wall. Yeah, it was fun, but even a time I was playing with selective colouring it felt gimmicky.

  • Yonaphoto.com

    I watched the documentary on Julius Shulman the other day, now HE was master of TS. Besides the fact he is a touching and remarkable photographer, he is a great mentor. “Visual Acoustics”, great watch!!!

  • Gertrude

    YYEEEEEEEAAAAAAHHHH, SOMEONE APPLIED A FILTER ANYONE CAN USE SO I REFUSE TO APPRECIATE WHAT HE’S DONE BECAUSE IT DOESN’T MEET MY OWN AESTHETIC STANDARD!!!!! LETS CRAP ALL OVER IT!!!!

    Some of you commenters make me sick. I really hope you get featured on PetaPixel one day and get a slew of commenters as myopic and rigid some of you act.

  • LUTZJ

    total crap…. idiotic plane of focus in someimages.

  • 343434

    shut up gertrud…

  • Buzzerfly

    Whew! I thought it was just me thinking these things as I scrolled through this guy’s iPhone photo collection. Thank you to Foggodyssea for posting the link to how this effect can be done well.

  • Luv22

    totally physical uncorrect…..

  • DamianM

    I agree.
    It wasnt done in post like this guy.

  • twojawas

    Great photos but none have that wow tilt shift effect that I’ve seen in so many others. You can’t just make any photo appear to have tilt-shift in photoshop.

  • Zane

    Lmao @ all the haters, just because he is cashing in on this effect.