PetaPixel

Police in the US to Turn iPhone Cameras Back on Citizens

If ordinary citizens have the right to photograph police in public places, what about the other way around? That’s a question that’s sure to be asked often in the coming days, as 40 law enforcement agencies across the US are planning to use iPhones to photograph civilians for the purpose of identifying wanted perps. The system, called Mobile Offender Recognition and Information System (MORIS), costs $3,000 apiece and will be able to do facial recognition searches on a database of known criminals. Photographers’ rights will apply to cops too — police won’t be required to ask permission before snapping a photograph of your face!

(via Amateur Photographer and WSJ)


 
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  • http://bounteo.us/ Rob

    Nothing against being photographed, yes. Using the photo to run a background check, possibly. I can see that being considered an unreasonable search. It really hinges on whether or not that process is “searching”. The fact that the process is unreasonable (as there is absolutely zero probable cause in the cited example) is without question.

  • http://bounteo.us/ Rob

    Photographing license plates and faces are two totally different things.

  • http://bounteo.us/ Rob

    Photographing license plates and faces are two totally different things.