PetaPixel

Photosynth Comes to the iPhone to Help You Shoot Stitched Panoramas

Microsoft’s jaw-dropping Photosynth technology has arrived on the iPhone as an app that allows you to easily create immersive 360-degree panoramas. All you need to do is load up the app and sweep your camera around in every direction, and the app automatically snaps photographs filling in the panoramic image (you can also tap it if it gets sluggish with its snapping).

Here’s a demonstration of the app in action:

You can download Photosynth for free from the iTunes App Store.

Photosynth (via ReadWriteWeb)


 
Get the hottest photo stories delivered to your inbox.
Get a daily digest of the latest headlines:
  • http://www.patenttrademarklitigation.com/index.html Patent Application

    Using an interactive capture method, the app collects photos of your environment as you pan around the scene, and creates a complete 360-degree image with its advanced photo-stitching engine. Once your photos have been combined to create a fully immersive panoramic photo, you can view the full image through the app’s built-in viewer and save it online at Photosynth.net.

  • anty

    pojebało ich z tym ajfonem :|

  • Tarmo

    Where is Android version?

  • http://www.facebook.com/john.kantor John Kantor

    Their “jaw-dropping” technology is a year later and not as good as their competitors, like AutoStitch and 360.

  • Matsrdr

    @facebook-627017781:disqus Hmm.. I think You are quite wrong there.
     Given that it doesn’t say so in this post, the “technoloy” is way more than a Year old, it’s just “”new on the IPhone””. And the “photosynth technology” is much more comprahensive and powerful then the mere “stitching programs” You compare it to. It can actually build 3D point representations out of a collection of totally disparately taken photos of for example a building, and calculate the position and field of view of the cameras that took the pictures.
    Look it up on the web, its quite interesting. Much more so than the Iphone app might convey.
    It was originaly a research project at University of Washington, by Noah Snavely, Steven M. Seitz, Richard Szeliski. This was bought by MicroSoft, who then released a Beta in 2006. So I dont think the “competitors” were “earlier”. And as far as quality goes, the iphone app seams to be quite a crippled version of the real program, but compared to the “full version” I don’t think the “competitors” are any better.