PetaPixel

Nikon D3 Aperture Blades and Shutter Curtain in Super Slow Motion

Here’s an interesting glimpse into what a DSLR’s aperture blades and shutter curtain look like in super slow motion. Specifically, it’s a Nikon D3 shooting at 11 frames per second with 1/4000 shutter speed and f/16, all captured at 5,000 frames per second. What’s amazing is that the shutter curtain moves so quickly that you can’t see the sensor at all, even at 5000fps!


 
 
  • Stephen

    What’s amazing is that these things don’t break more often.

  • http://www.photoblog.com/smbunation Mike

    Wow. Look at how that mirror clanks when it comes back into place. Fascinating. Also, Watch the aperture blades move around a bit to form that circular opening as it gets smaller. It’s as though they don’t work precisely in sync and take a few micro clicks to line up. Although, this video was shot as such a fast speed, it’s no issue at all I’m sure for the photographer.

  • Ranma13

    Actually, you CAN see the sensor, or rather a narrow slit of it. At 1/4000 shutter speed, the first curtain will be shortly followed by the second curtain, so you won’t be able to see the entire sensor exposed at once. Another post on PP describes it better than I can:

    http://www.petapixel.com/2011/02/04/lesson-on-slr-shutters-and-how-flash-synchronization-works/

  • br

    my thoughts exactly