guestpost

The Seated Perspective: Photography from a Wheelchair

My name is Emanuel, I live in Switzerland, and as long as I can remember I've been in a wheelchair. In my life I've tried a lot of different hobbies, and almost every single time I felt compromised by my wheelchair... apart from taking photographs.

The Photographer’s Manifesto

I have seen absolutely beautiful things happen in the photo industry. I’ve seen strangers become best friends, I’ve seen grand ideas being brought to life, and I’ve seen photographers grow from beginners to mentors. I’ve seen so many things that make me proud to be a part of such an amazing community.

The sad news is that I’ve also seen the uglier side of it. I’ve seen jealousy turn into bad-mouthing, I’ve seen photographers knowingly leave out key techniques from classes or talks, and I’ve seen new photographers become discouraged and disheartened by the cold shoulders of the more popular photographers in the industry. For a lack of better words, that sucks. Nobody benefits from negativity like that so we might as well get rid of it.

Exploring Different Perspectives of Poverty Through Photography

Editor's note: We came across Duncan McNicholl's work a while back and found it interesting, so we invited him to write a guest post regarding his project. His work has been featured by quite a few publications and websites in recent times.

Many people only experience sub-Saharan Africa through photographs. The teary-eyed child in rags is familiar to all of us as the portrait of poverty charities use to communicate a hopelessness in need of our pity and charity. I reacted very strongly to these images when I returned from Africa in 2008 after a 4 month volunteer placement in Malawi, working with Engineers Without Borders Canada. I compared the images I saw to my Malawian friends – people who embodied intelligence, resilience, and compassion – and I felt lied to.