PetaPixel

Incredible Online Gallery of High-Res Film Scans from Every Apollo Mission

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The title sort of gives it away, but did you know that there is an online archive that contains high-resolution film scans from every Apollo mission? The gallery contains all of the incredible photos taken during each of the missions — from Apollo 1 all the way through Apollo 17 — with some 1,000+ photos from Apollo 11 alone.

The archive, officially the Apollo Image Gallery, was put together by the Project Apollo Archive by scanning photographs provided by the NASA History Office, Kennedy Space Center and Johnson Space Center.

Since all of these images were taken by NASA astronauts in the course of duty, they’re all Public Domain and free for you to browse through, download, share and use to your heart’s content.

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Unfortunately, the website can be a bit of a hassle to navigate through — there’s no way to browse image after image in any sort of slide show format — but it’s a relatively small con when you consider the work it took to scan and bring all of these photos under one roof.

From photos taken on the moon and in space, to press release photos and training exercises it’s all there in glorious high-resolution. Here’s a selection of images taken from all of the Apollo missions, complete with descriptions in the captions:

Astronauts Grissom, White and Chaffee of Apollo 1 on their way to the training exercise that would ultimately lead to their tragic deaths.

Astronauts Grissom, White and Chaffee of Apollo 1 on their way to the training exercise that would ultimately lead to their tragic deaths.

Apollo 7 astronaut Wally Schirra

Apollo 7 astronaut Wally Schirra

The crew of Apollo 8 photograph the Earth rising over the Moon. They were the first humans ever to witness this incredible phenomenon.

The crew of Apollo 8 photograph the Earth rising over the Moon. They were the first humans ever to witness this incredible phenomenon.

Apollo 9 astronaut Dave Scott emerging from the command module hatch.

Apollo 9 astronaut Dave Scott emerging from the command module hatch.

The Apollo 10 command module as seen from the lunar module during lunar orbit tests.

The Apollo 10 command module as seen from the lunar module during lunar orbit tests.

Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin

Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin sets up a solar wind experiment on the moon.

The first photo Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong took after setting foot on the Moon.

The first photo Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong took after setting foot on the Moon.

Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin

Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin salutes the United States flag while Neil Armstrong photographs him. A moment caught on 16mm film here.

Apollo 12 astronaut Pete Conrad exiting the lunar module.

Apollo 12 astronaut Pete Conrad exiting the lunar module.

Photograph of the crippled Apollo 13 service module after separation

Photograph of the crippled Apollo 13 service module after separation

Apollo 14 lunar module pilot Edgar Mitchell

Apollo 14 lunar module pilot Edgar Mitchell

Apollo 15 astronaut Jim Irwin working on the lunar rover.

Apollo 15 astronaut Jim Irwin working on the lunar rover.

Apollo 16 astronaut John Young

Apollo 16 astronaut John Young

Apollo 17 astronaut Harrison Schmitt collecting a soil sample on the south side of the rim boulders at Station 5. Apollo 17 was the last manned space flight to travel beyond low Earth orbit.

Apollo 17 astronaut Harrison Schmitt collecting a soil sample on the south side of the rim boulders at Station 5. Apollo 17 was the last manned space flight to travel beyond low Earth orbit.

These are just some of our favorites that we found while browsing the massive archive. There are literally thousands more where these came from.

To check out the full gallery for yourself — or if you’d like to see any of the photos we shared above in beautiful high-resolution — head over to the Project Apollo Archive’s image gallery by clicking here.

(via Doobybrain)


Image credits: Photographs by NASA


 
  • Shinzobenzowitz IV

    Instead of blowing up Goat Herders with 5 million dollar missiles fired from drones on suspicions of being terrorists… I wish the military industrial complex would once again to the stars to quench their greed.

  • Shinzobenzowitz IV

    *once again LOOK to the stars…

  • Redstart

    Fake! The shadows do not line up with the acute solar deflection as noted by astrologists on the day of the landing. Hasselblad clearly staged these shots to distract us from the atrocity that is the Hasselblad Lunar camera.

  • http://sciencedem.blogspot.com editor

    Decades since we’ve been to the Moon. Very sad. Im 53; was 9 when Armstrong landed. What a waste of years. The Iraq War should have been another mission to the Moon or Mars. All we do now is go round and round and round the Earth

  • http://sciencedem.blogspot.com editor

    Hey nitwit; go find an “Is Elvis still alive?” site to hang. We went to the moon because its easy to go to the moon.

  • Redstart

    Lighten up, Francis…

  • PlanetOrphan

    Damn those guys had some guts, and how can anyone doubt those photos ?

  • Zos Xavius

    *whoosh*

  • superfreak

    No, you didn’t invent the internet. Go google it.

  • superfreak

    Great, but why can’t we see all that junk in the moon, from Earth?

  • benny
  • http://www.observingtime.com/ agour

    Nice one petapixel, you’ve just taken NASA offline ;)

    “The Apollo Image Gallery is unavailable for the immediate future due to server overload.
    Access will be restored in coming days once the publicity generated by the petapixel.com article subsides.”

  • http://www.petapixel.com Michael Zhang

    Hahaha. Well, that’s one we haven’t seen before.

  • http://www.observingtime.com/ agour

    Definitely one to add to your resume!

  • http://www.powalowski.de/ POWALOWSKI

    Wow. You made it. Overloaded the NASA servers ;-)

  • Peter

    Someone needs to make a torrent of all these files

  • Tupac (cuz he’s still alive…

    lol that’s funny because Non Government agencies have created long distance green lasers that have been shot towards the moon, that scanned the moon’s surface and have proof of man made objects left by the astronauts lol dumbass. Oh, and don’t forget to bring a parachute with you at all times in case you fall off the end of the Earth!! Can never be too safe

  • Chris

    It definitely took more work to build the internet than go to the moon.Just laborwise. Man hours, But we built the internet, didn’t we? Why WOULDN’T we have gone to the moon? We had the technology, the resources, and the political will.

  • SYunghans

    Hundreds of thousands of tax dollars gone to waste by a little TOO much good publicity…. Well, probably not that much, but it’s still impressive, overloading NASA web servers by plugging one of their sites.

  • superfreak

    The crafts. Not the sites.

  • Apollo 69

    Welp, looks like we unintentionally DDOS’d the NASA page. Congrats, guys, we are legion.

  • Apollo 69

    We are legion???
    Unintentional DDOS ftw!

  • Apollo 69

    ‘Merica!!!

  • Sandy

    Mythbusters proved that the pictures and the shadows had natural causes (light deflecting off the metal)

  • David Safier

    in the photo with the flag it’s missing the shadow, fake. we never landed

  • a

    you can see the shadow of the pole which is a very thin line, in the 16mm picture you can see that shadow of the flag itself is aligned with the torso of the astronaut

  • David Safier

    i seen it in the 16mm but not in the large scan

  • SciGirl

    This isn’t a NASA website. Also, some of the information is wrong.
    For example, the caption data for the 4th image should read Walter Cunningham- not Wally Schirra.

  • Simon

    On the photo of Aldrin saluting the flag, where is the shadow of the flag? I am a photographer and i know this picture is not right. Enlarge it to 300% and you can tell it’s fake.

  • MarkmBha

    You are correct.
    I missed that one.

  • Mag10

    If you rely on ”astrologists” you’ll never get very accurate information. BTW the ”non converging shadows” issue is easily resolved. Go take pictures of rocky flats at sun down when shadows are very long (as per conditions on the Moon). Your shadows won’t line up either,