PetaPixel

Photo Series of Students Posing in Their Housing Around the World

Imagesconnect.org

Images Connect is an international photo project by photographer Henny Boogert that explores the similarities and differences between the places students call home around the world.

Boogert believes that all students worldwide share the same goals: to move forward and establish a career. Their housing — be it a room, an apartment or a hut — is as universal as those goals, and the Images Connect project aims to highlight that universality.

Boogert visited 10 countries to capture all of his images: Kenya, Russia, Moldova, Cuba, Bolivia, the Philippines, India, Hong Kong, Italy and his home country of the Netherlands. And even though he chose such a diverse selection of countries, he found much the same thing everywhere he went.

“A bed, a small seating area, some posters on the wall and clutter on the ground,” a representation of those goals and, in some cases, the sacrifices required to reach them:

Rasul, Marat and Oleg from Russia

Rasul, Marat and Oleg from Russia

Anna Oparina, Mihaela Solovei, Ann Filatova and an unidentified friend from Chisinau, Moldova

Anna Oparina, Mihaela Solovei, Ann Filatova and an unidentified friend from Chisinau, Moldova

Carmen Luz from Santa Clara, Cuba

Carmen Luz from Santa Clara, Cuba

Angelica Simeone from Napoli, Italy

Angelica Simeone from Napoli, Italy

Catherine Lee from Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Catherine Lee from Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Yusta from Nairobi, Kenya

Yusta from Nairobi, Kenya

Evelin Esther Veliz Escobar from Cochabamba, Bolivia

Evelin Esther Veliz Escobar from Cochabamba, Bolivia

Zeeshan Farooqui from Mumbai, India

Zeeshan Farooqui from Mumbai, India

Frances Sheryn Cabuyoo from Manila, Philippines

Frances Sheryn Cabuyoo from Manila, Philippines

Sueiras from Havana, Cuba

Sueiras from Havana, Cuba

Angie Kamuyu from Nairobi, Kenya

Angie Kamuyu from Nairobi, Kenya

Wouter Wilbrink from Groningen, Netherlands

Wouter Wilbrink from Groningen, Netherlands

Giuseppe Migliaccio from Napoli, Italy

Giuseppe Migliaccio from Napoli, Italy

Kris Anne Estoesta from Manilla, Philippines

Kris Anne Estoesta from Manilla, Philippines

Marina Vyrskaya from Moscow, Russia

Marina Vyrskaya from Moscow, Russia

Eugeni Castravet from Chisinau, Moldova

Eugeni Castravet from Chisinau, Moldova

Carla Andrea Vergara Loizaga from Cochabamba, Bolivia

Carla Andrea Vergara Loizaga from Cochabamba, Bolivia

Douglas Yam Tin Yi, Bosco Kuo Ko Wai and Eric Ng Chung Wing from Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Douglas Yam Tin Yi, Bosco Kuo Ko Wai and Eric Ng Chung Wing from Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Siddharth Joshi from Mumbai, India

Siddharth Joshi from Mumbai, India

For each person he photographed, Boogert also put together a small about page with more info about each person and sometimes even a video that shows them going about their daily lives. To see the rest of the pictures and/or get better acquainted with the students above, head over to the Image Connect website by clicking here.


Image credits: Photographs by Henny Boogert and used with permission.


 
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  • http://www.richardsnotes.org Richard

    Fantastic.

  • SgtBoognish

    In terms of composition I’m not crazy about the photos, but this is a nice idea. Interesting insight into students’ lives across many cultures!

  • http://twitter.com/davidwoollatt David Woollatt

    Love these, great work :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/igor.kennn Igor Ken

    nice project!

  • brandon

    i see those damn CFLs have gotten everywhere.

  • http://garyobrien.com Gary O’Brien

    Sometimes the content dictates shooting vertical, sometimes horizontal.
    I wish the photographer had taken this into consideration. There’s a lot of wasted space in many of these images.

  • DamianM

    Blah

  • Like_the_project

    OK-had to go to the Image Connect site-these images aren’t the cream of the crop.
    Keep up the good work Mr. Boogert. LOL-a motor scooter in the living room-universal dumb ass student can’t figure out why he won’t get his deposit when he moves out.

  • Ferris

    There’s a lot of wasted negativity in your comment. This series is fantastic.

  • http://garyobrien.com Gary O’Brien

    I believe you’re mistaking honest critique for negativity. Photographers who wish to improve their work can tell the difference.

  • Ferris

    No, I believe you’re being negative about an aesthetic choice you disagree with instead of appreciating the choices that have been made. People who aren’t dicks can tell the difference.

  • http://garyobrien.com Gary O’Brien

    I feel reasonably sure your comment falls under the heading of negativity. It’s hard when someone disagrees with you and is willing to call you on it. I hope you feel better now.

  • Albert Molnar

    Just reading through this article today and I have to say, I agree with his initial comment. Yours is far off the mark. You boldly claim that he has wasted space instead of taking a moment to think about why he has used the space in the way he has. Instead you simply state he has wasted it instead of pointing out you would have made a different aesthetic choice. Nor do you really make any concrete observations about how he might have better used the space except to say it was wrong. Moreover, the focus is on the subject as opposed to the a space around them, to which you have given little to no consideration.

    There’s honest critique and then there’s pooping on someone’s work when it is given a public forum for what it DOES achieve, not for what it doesn’t.

  • Yankee

    I believe the choice of portrait orientation is very well made in these cases. I think that it gives a better sense of depth to each individual picture and allows the viewer to maintain a subconscious frame of reference in judging space. And for this series, space (i.e., roominess, in its most literal sense) or lack thereof is quite important, as any student anywhere in the world will tell you.

    By allowing the ceiling to take up so much room in nearly every picture, for instance, the photographer is in control of how much space there appears to be in each room (compare Yusta’s room in Nairobi to Giuseppe’s room in Napoli, for instance). Cramped versus roomy. And works well to reinforce or rebuke any preconceptions, if you have them.

    Nice pics :) anyway

  • http://garyobrien.com Gary O’Brien

    Albert, I appreciate your input.

    The brevity of the internet tends to obscure communication and your point is well taken. If the original criticism is not clear, one must ask for clarity. You have done so and I commend you for that.
    The term ‘wasted space’ is one that I heard hundreds of times over 30 years in newspaper photojournalism. The images in this collection communicate clearly, not only about the subjects of the image but about they choices they make in their space and the things they put there.
    I just happen to think some of these images don’t work very well because of the photographers’ ‘aesthetic choice’ to shoot everything vertical.
    If a photographer is beholden to this kind of choice, he or she must work harder – it’s kind of like having a hand tied behind one’s back.
    BTW, if you are interested in a successful use of this aesthetic choice, look up “Paris by Night” by BrassaÏ. It was re-published by Pantheon in 1987. The images are all vertical and they all work. It certainly changed how I think about framing my images.

  • http://garyobrien.com Gary O’Brien

    This is a good point, thank you for sharing it.