PetaPixel

Breathtaking Time-Lapse Shot Over Six Months on New Zealand’s North Island

This time-lapse, shot by photographer Bevan Percival on New Zealand’s North Island, has to be one of the most beautiful we’ve ever shared. Shot over the course of six months using a Canon 5D Mark II, various lenses, and a Dynamic Perception 6′ Stage Zero motorized dolly, it will keep your eyes glued to the screen all five minutes and fifty-nine seconds.

newzealandtimelapse

In keeping with the stunning visuals, Percival’s description isn’t about the gear he used or even the places he went. It’s about what inspires him to do what he does and how it has impacted him:

I’m driven by chasing fleeting moments of dramatic light on beautiful landscapes and also capturing the night sky and milky way in all its glory is a real buzz. Not to mention curling up out under the stars beside all the gear for nights at a time catching some sleep here and there between checking the gear, changing batteries and staring up into eternity with spectacular meteors burning up in the cosmic shore out of the corner of your eye.

To see more of Percival’s time-lapse work, you can check out his Vimeo profile by clicking here.

(via DIY Photography)


 
 
  • ripley

    New Zealand has some amazing natural scenery. It’s just too bad that our Prime Minister is more interested in making money that helping to protect our natural resources. He cuts jobs from the Department of Conservation, he stops environmental reporting, while telling the world we’re 100% pure. We’re not.

  • wellington

    So proud to say that’s our country! The below comment is negative.

  • 45435435

    well it´s true so what?

  • PhotoBeaver

    sounds just like my country. Canada :-(

  • ripley

    Well, the National government is planning on mining areas just like the ones you see in this video. They want to mine the Denniston Plateau in Southland, which is home to countless native species, including some that are found nowhere else in New Zealand. They’ve also been scouting for deep sea oil drilling, and if they couldn’t handle the oil spill from the Rina (which was *really* small), how are they going to handle a larger one?