winner

HIPA Grand Prize Winner Looks Like It May be a Big Photoshop Fail

The photograph above by Chinese photographer China’s Fuyang Zhou just won $120,000 as the Hamdan International Photography Awards (HIPA) overall grand prize winner. The theme was "Creating the Future," and you can see why the photo won: it's a wonderful composition that captures the spirit of that theme. And yet, something seems off about it...

World Press Photo Jury Chair Talks About This Year’s Impressive Winning Images

World Press Photo 2014 jury chair Gary Knight has said that many of this year's entries into the contest were "missing something" -- and there's quite a bit of controversy surrounding the contest -- but he doesn't want that to take away from your opinion of the winning photographs.

To that end, World Press Photo has released the video above in which Knight talks about several of the winning entries and why the jury picked them to take home first (and in one case second) prize.

Photographer Combines 2,877 Stills Into an Impressive Stop Motion Time-Lapse

The above video is photographer Jonathan DeNicholas' impressive entry for the 30 Day Filming Project contest put together by Sue Bryce and announced at creativeLIVE. The contest asked entrants to submit a 2 minute video in which you captured something that made you smile every day for a month, and DeNicholas entry was one of the 6 winners (of over 100 submitted) that were then showcased on You Can't Be Serious.

Gaza City Funeral Procession Photo Wins World Press Photo 2012

The photograph above by Swedish Dagens Nyheter photographer Paul Hansen has been selected as the World Press Photo of the Year 2012. It's a powerful image that shows a funeral procession in Gaza City, with men carrying the bodies of two children while the body of their father trails behind on a stretcher.

Two Photographers Selected for $500,000 MacArthur “Genius” Grants

Every year, the MacArthur Foundation selects 20-40 exceptional people in the United States and awards them with $500,000 MacArthur Fellowship "Genius Grants" -- prestigious awards that come with no strings attached. Winners are of all ages, come from all kinds of fields, and are selected purely because they "show exceptional merit and promise for continued and enhanced creative work."

The 2012 winners were revealed today, and of the 23 people selected, two of them were photographers: Uta Barth and An-My Lê.

Lonely Diving Photos Snag Grand Prize in Google’s Photo Contest

Last November Google launched a Photography Prize for finding the "photography stars of the future". After receiving entries from 20,000 students in 146 countries, Google announced the winners last week. The grand prize winner was Viktor Johansson, a 24-year-old photography student from Sweden who photographed the loneliness of competitive diving:

The judges were impressed and captivated with his series that focused on Christoffer Eskilsson, Sweden’s best male diver from 10 metres. Viktor has chosen to show us an alternative view, one that we are not used to seeing from sport photography in the media. Instead of glamorous action shots of an athlete in competition, he has produced arresting and unexpected photographs that focus on the long, lonely hours of repetitive training and practice that it takes to excel in your field.

Porcelain Unicorn: A Powerful Short Film in Six Lines and Three Minutes

Last year Philips ran a contest called Parallel Lines in which they asked people to create a three-minute short film using only six lines of dialogue: “What is that?”, “It’s a unicorn”, “Never seen one up close before”, “Beautiful”, “Get away, get away”, and “I’m sorry”. After more than 600 entries were submitted, director Ridley Scott selected the above film, titled "Porcelain Unicorn", as the winner.