weatherballoon

This is the World’s First Hyperlapse of a Solar Eclipse from 165,000ft

In August of 2017, the team at Sent Into Space travelled to Fort Laramie, Wyoming to capture something incredible for the BBC. Using a high-altitude weather balloon and a 360° camera array, they captured what they claim is "the world's first hyperlapse of an eclipse from the edge of space."

Samsung’s ‘SpaceSelfie’ Satellite Crash Landed in Someone’s Yard

Samsung's 'SpaceSelfie' satellite, which was supposed to stay aloft until October 31st, came crashing to Earth this weekend. The device, which was held aloft at 65,000 feet by a massive high-altitude balloon, had to make a "planned" landing on Saturday, only a day after Samsung announced the launch of the campaign.

Camera on Balloon Captures the Total Solar Eclipse from Near Space

Self-proclaimed "armchair aeroscience geek" Liem Bahneman managed to capture the Great American Eclipse from an unusual and amazing perspective: he loaded cameras onto a high-altitude and shot what the total solar eclipse looks like from the edge of space. The 9-minute video above is what one camera recorded over Central Oregon.

These Guys Launched a Sony a7S Into the Stratosphere to Shoot the Aurora

The folks at Night Crew Labs just created something awesome. In March, they strapped a Sony a7S and an external recorder to a weather balloon, and launched it up to about 78,000 feet. From there, they captured what they believe to be the "first ever" video of the Aurora Borealis from the stratosphere.

These Guys Sent a Sony A7s to 91,000 Feet from SF on a Weather Balloon

A group of 5 friends recently attached 5 cameras to a stratospheric weather balloon and launched it from the Presidio in San Francisco. The rig traveled to 91,470 above Northern California, popped, and then landed over 100 miles away.

The aerial photos and videos it captured are remarkable, showing sweeping views of San Francisco and the surrounding Bay Area.

Lost Weather Balloon GoPro Found 2 Years Later with Grand Canyon ‘Money Shot’

Back in 2013, five friends in Arizona decided to capture some photos and video from the edge of space by sending a GoPro up on a weather balloon. The camera made it to 98,000 feet, but the guys lost track of it after it landed out of cell phone tower range. All seemed lost, and the team spent months wondering if they'd ever find the camera.

Fast forward to a couple of months ago: the team got a phone call from a woman who found a strange box with their names on it. In it was the camera and all of the original images.

Using a Giant Weather Balloon to Create Artificial Moonlight

Earlier this summer I was asked to shoot a campaign for Airwick USA to highlight the many uses for their new color changing candles. It was going to be a summery outdoor shoot involving two distinct ‘looks’ for the images; one with the candles being used at night time, and the other where they were being used during sunset or dusk activities.

$25 Space Camera: Raspberry Pi Camera Snaps Photos of Earth on a Balloon

Raspberry Pi's new Camera Module is starting to hit store shelves, and we're starting to see some interesting photo experiments being done with the simple programmable camera kit.

High altitude ballooning enthusiast Dave Akerman recently decided to send his $25 module up to the edges of space to snap photographs of Earth and beam images back during its flight.

Kepler Space Kit Makes Taking Pictures From Space a Snap

Hanging a camera from a weather balloon and using it to snap photographs from the edges of space has become quite a popular project for space and photography enthusiasts as of late. If you want to try your hand at it, but don't have the time, energy, creativity, or resources to create the space vessel yourself, NYC-based industrial design company Quirky is working on a product just for you.

Dad Sends His Son’s Toy Train to Space, Creates Short Film Showing the Journey

Sending a camera up to the edges of space on a weather balloon has been done quite a bit now, but perhaps none of the projects have been as creative as Ron Fugelseth's effort. Ron worked with his 4-year-old son to give his son's favorite toy train Stanley a fun and exciting ride to space. They built a rig consisting of a weather balloon, a styrofoam box, an HD video camera, and an old cell phone for GPS. Stanley was then attached to the outside of the box using a rod, positioned so that the camera would be perpetually pointed at Stanley with the world in the background.

Students Send Nikon D300s to Space in a Beer Cooler

Sending cameras to the edges of space on a weather balloon has become a pretty popular activity as of late, but up to now people were mostly sending up cell phones, compact cameras, and small HD video cameras (e.g. GoPros). While those devices are light and relatively cheap, the quality of images produced isn't the best.

Family Science Project Sends Video Camera to the Edges of Space

Luke Geissbuhler and his kids decided they wanted to send an HD video camera high into the stratosphere, so they spent eight months researching and testing for their project before finally launching their Go Pro Hero HD-laden balloon from Newburgh, New York. The balloon rose for 70 minutes to a height of 100,000 feet (19 miles) above the Earth before popping.

SD Card-Laden Paper Airplanes to Be Dropped from the Edge of Space

Viral marketing agency The Viral Factory is helping Samsung with an experiment in which they're planning to drop 100 SD cards attached to paper airplanes from 21 miles above the Earth in the stratosphere. Instructions will be printed on the paper airplane informing anyone who finds one of the experiment and what they can do to participate. Finders are encouraged to shoot with the cards and then upload anything taken to the Project Space Planes website.

The claim that the planes will "carry the messages across the world" is a bit farfetched, but supposedly the planes could potentially travel hundreds of miles depending on the wind conditions. The experiment is planned for mid-October.