taxidermy

These Wildlife Photos Aren’t What They Seem

My photo project Wildlife is a series of black-and-white film photos showing some of the most amazing and beautiful animals in the world. But these photos aren’t what they appear to be.

Peaceful Still-Life Photographs Combine Kitchenware and Roadkill

Certainly there's ample artistic precedent for including a dead animal or two in a still-life. Old Master paintings are rife with images of freshly killed ducks, bunnies and fish awaiting a trip to the dinner table.

Photographer (and certified taxidermist) Kimberly Witham slyly subverts that tradition with "Domestic Arrangements," a series of still-life photographs that combine modern kitchenware and other items of domestic life with birds, squirrels and other animals retrieved from the roadside. All items come from within a short radius around Witham's New Jersey home.

Birds of Aperture Combines the Worlds of Cameras and Taxidermy

Photographer Paul Octavious has collected a number of vintage cameras over the years, with some of them handed down to him by his grandfather. One day a house in his neighborhood had an estate sale for an old man that had recently passed away. When Octavious paid the big house a visit, he found that the man was a taxidermist with a large collection of stuffed birds and bird wings.

The Armadillo Camera and Other Wacky Camera Creations

Swiss photography duo Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs were featured here in April of last year for their DIY large format camera created out of a stack of books. It turns out books aren't the only things the two are making cameras with: they also have cameras that mix the worlds of taxidermy and photography.

For their project titled Camera Collection, Onorato and Krebs created one-of-a-kind cameras out of extremely unusual things -- including an armadillo (shown above).