tablet

Adobe Looking to Bring Lightroom-style RAW Editing to a Tablet Near You

Tablet computers may soon rival desktop computers in RAW editing potential. Adobe has revealed that it's working on bringing Lightroom-style photo editing to tablet devices, and the software would include powerful RAW photo editing features that are currently found only in the desktop versions of Lightroom and Adobe Camera Raw.

How to Back Up Your Pictures Using an Android Tablet and External Hard Drives

In this post, I will share some of my techniques and experiences of backing up photos using a tablet while traveling.

Like most other landscape/nature/travel photographers, when I am on a multi-day or multi-week photo tour, I face the problem of backing up my photos from the memory cards. A laptop computer is a nature choice for most people. With a laptop, we can copy files between the memory cards, laptop disk drive, and external disks. We can even do some light editing.

CamRanger: Wirelessly Control Canon and Nikon DSLRs with an iOS Device

Wireless adapters for digital cameras can be very pricey accessories, especially when you're dealing with high-end DSLRs. Manufacturers can squeeze more money out of those who pay thousands for a camera by charging hundreds for an adapter, even though a cheaper one could work just fine. What's more, the adapters are often designed specifically for certain cameras, making them useless if you change models or makes.

Samsung Giving Away Galaxy Tablets with Its NX Mirrorless Cameras

Leave it up to Samsung to hold crazy promotions for its mirrorless cameras -- at least in the UK. The company recently offered to give a NX1000 mirrorless camera to anyone named David Bailey; 142 David Baileys came forward to claim their camera. Now the camera maker is doing another unique promo, and this time it's open to the general public: it's giving away tablet computers with its mirrorless cameras.

Eerie Human Hologram Photograph Shot Using a Tablet and Light Painting

In 1993, a convicted murderer named Joseph Paul Jernigan was executed. Having donated his body to science, his body was sliced to provide 1,871 high-resolution cross-section photographs of human anatomy in what is known as the Visible Human Project.

Last year we shared a project called 12:31, in which two photographers used an animation of the cross-section slices to photograph ghostly figures through light-painting. Inspired by that project, photographer Andy Leach recently used the animation for a shoot of his own: he recreated Jernigan's body as a hologram.

This Photograph Was Shot Using a Tablet Computer, the Google Nexus 10

The photograph seen here was shot using a tablet computer -- one that doesn't officially exist yet. Google engineering SVP Vic Gundotra posted the image to Google+ at 4:57 this morning with the caption, "Early morning walk on the beach." A quick peek at the EXIF data reveals that it was captured with the "Google Nexus 10," a tablet that'll reportedly be unveiled at a press event next Monday.

Adobe Launches Photoshop Touch for iOS and Android Tablets

After announcing its impending arrival last year, Adobe today officially launched Photoshop Touch for the iPad and Android-powered tablets. The app offers many of Photoshop's core tools:

Use Photoshop features designed for the tablet such as layers, selection tools, adjustments, and filters to create mind-blowing images. Use new Scribble Select to easily keep and remove elements of an image.

It's priced at $10 and is available from the iTunes App Store and the Android Market.

It’s Not Just Phones: Tablets Are Trying to Replace Compact Cameras As Well

Guess what camera was used to shoot the photograph above? A tablet computer. It was shot using the new ASUS Eee Pad Transformer Prime tablet, which features a camera with a 8-megapixel back-illuminated CMOS sensor, an f/2.4 autofocus lens, an LED flash, and 1080p HD video recording. Looks like we'll soon be seeing a lot more people whip out tablets for everyday snapshots.

How to Scan Film Using Your Phone or Tablet Computer

We shared a couple weeks ago that it's possible to scan film using an ordinary flatbed scanner and a DIY cardboard adapter, but did you know you can also use a large-screen cell phone or tablet computer to provide the necessary backlighting? All you need is a way to turn a large portion of the screen entirely white (e.g. a "flashlight" app). Simply place the device facedown over the film on the scanner, and scan it with the cover open.

Flickr Stats Confirm It: No One Uses the iPad 2 as a Camera

When the iPad 2 was announced a couple months ago, it was called "the first 'camera' to have a sensor resolution lower than the display resolution." Commenters were quick to point out that Apple never intended for the device to be used as a camera like the iPhone is, and therefore was probably able to keep costs down by limiting it to a 0.7 megapixel sensor. Now, with millions of the devices in consumers' hands, Flickr's camera statistics confirm what we suspected all along: no one uses the iPad 2 as a camera.

Camera on the iPad 2 is a World’s First, but in a Bad Way

When the iPad 2 was announced a week ago, many people were undoubtedly excited that front and rear-facing cameras were added to the device. However, rather than endow the iPad with a rear-camera equal or superior to the iPhone 4's, the geniuses at Apple decided to add a pretty lame one, giving it the (dis)honor of being the first "camera" to have a sensor resolution lower than the display resolution.

Sports Illustrated as an HTML5 Magazine

Today at Google I/O, Sports Illustrated editor Terry McDonell showcased this demo of the HTML5 version of the magazine. Last December, SI released a mockup video of how their online version would look as an app, but this version is based on the web and can be viewed with laptop and tablet browsers. It looks like a print magazine layout, with fantastic spreads, photos, and fonts, but it also has a lot of unique multimedia features that are incorporated into the design.