robot

Hexo+ Autonomous Camera Drone Lets the Adrenaline Junkies Film Their Own Stunts

Adrenaline junkies who want to capture their stunts on video have thus far been limited to two options. They either had someone else photograph/film them, or strapped an action cam to themselves for some first person point of view shots. Now, thanks to Hexo+, they have a third option: have your autonomous drone film you from above.

‘Face Cartography’ Captures Portraits at a Whopping 900 Megapixels

Using an industrial–strength robotic arm, custom software, a Canon EOS Mark ll and a 180mm macro lens converted into a telecentrical lens, Swiss photographer Daniel Boschung has created an automated portrait machine. Made to map out "Face Cartography", the machine and resulting images capture incredibly detailed and hyperrealistic photographs of subjects.

Steve Winter Gets Up Close and Personal with a Curious Tiger Using a Robot Rig

National Geographic photographer Steve Winter is a big on the big cats. After all, he was willing to spend 12 months chasing after the perfect mountain lion shot. In the video above, he didn't have to exhibit that sort of patience, instead he had to control a finicky robotic camera rig as best he could and try to snap some awesome photos of a curious tiger.

Pixy: A Low Cost Camera that Recognizes and Follows Objects by Color

Camera technology is always being used/tweaked in one way or another to yield surprising or novel results. In some cases, that means creating a camera that sees like a bug's eye. In others, one that perceives only motion, like a retina.

The most recent camera innovation we've stumble across falls a bit closer to the second of those. It's called Pixy, and it's a color-detecting camera that might some day soon be the eye with which your friendly neighborhood robot sees and interprets the world.

Photographing Serengeti Lions Up Close Using Infrared, Robots and Drones

National Geographic photographer Michael "Nick" Nichols has spent the last few years in the Serengeti capturing NatGeo-worthy, one-of-a-kind photos of lions. The amazing photos that illustrate the story Serengeti Lions in this month's issue of the magazine were all taken by Nichols, and in the video above we get a tiny peek at how he managed to get such unbelievable views.

Amazing Slow Motion Footage Using a High Speed Camera Robot

Super slow motion footage captured by high speed cameras usually shows slow movements (if any), but German studio The Marmalade came up with a brilliant way of speeding up the movements: a high-speed robot camera operator.

Our groundbreaking High Speed Motion Control System 'Spike' brings the creative freedom of a moving camera to the world of high speed filming and so enables us to create shots that would be impossible to achieve otherwise. 'Spike' can freely move the camera with unparalleled speed and precision, thereby removing the previously existing creative limitation of having to shoot high speed sequences with a locked camera.

By marrying the hardware of a sturdy and reliable industrial robot to software that was built from the ground up for the demands of motion controlled high speed imaging, we developed a unique system for creating real life camera moves with the ease of use normally associated with 3D Animation.

The system does camera moves that are exactly repeatable, allowing them to be slightly tweaked until the shot is just right.

Self-Portrait Machine Turns Your Hand Into a Photo Printer

"Blind Self-Portrait" is a project by artists Kyle McDonald and Matt Mets that's based around a machine that can help you turn photographs into sketches. The machine constantly track's the subject's face using a camera and translates the image into a line-drawing and x- and y-coordinates. The user then rests their hand on the machine's "hand" and presses a pen into a piece of paper. The robot hand does the rest of the work, guiding the hand into drawing the photograph as the person sits back and watches the magic happen.

LightPlot: A Robotic Arm That Creates Animated Light Paintings

The photos that went into the animation above were all created in-camera using software and a robotic arm programmed before hand with predetermined patterns. The project, known as LightPlot, started as an NXT Lego experiment in stop-motion photography by Ben Cowell-Thomas. He wanted to create a motion control rig for stop-motion using NXT, but as he was looking through some light painting projects online, he began to wonder how he could turn his lego project into a light painting rig.

Photos of a Lone Robot’s Attempt to Coexist with the Natural World

Photographer Thomas Jackson, whose swarm photos we shared earlier this week, has a creative project titled The Robot that "offers a darkly humorous narrataive about a lone robot's failure to co-exist with the natural world." It's a series of photos that brings a cleverly arranged heap of metal to life.

Light Painting Art Done Using Swarms of Robot Vacuum Cleaners

This light painting photograph was created by a group of students over in Germany using a swarm of seven Roomba automated vacuum cleaners. Each one had a different colored LED light attached to the top, making the resulting photo look like some kind of robotic Jackson Pollock painting. There's actually an entire Flickr group dedicated to using Roombas for light painting -- check it out of you have one of these robot minions serving you in your home.

Paparazzi Bot Prowls for Smiling Faces

The Paparazzi Bots are a series of robots invented by Ken Rinaldo, a faculty member in the Department of Art at Ohio State University. Each bot is autonomous, and moves about on a wheeled platform, using infrared sensors to move towards humans. It's goal is to take single photographs of people, and it makes decisions on whether or not to capture the photograph based on facial expressions of the subject. If you happen to be smiling, the bot is more likely to photograph you.