rig

Shooting Above-and-Below Photos of Icebergs with a Custom Camera Rig

Photographer Steve Mandel just returned from Antarctica, where he made photos of icebergs using an underwater camera, a surface camera, and a drone.

For his underwater shots, Mandel shot each photo so that it's a split view in a single frame: half of it shows the iceberg above water, and half shows what's below.

GoPro’s 16-Camera 360° Rig is Called the Odyssey and Will Cost $15,000

Back in May, Google announced "JUMP", a new technology standard aimed at creating fully immersive content for virtual reality. At the time, Google showed off a demo camera rig that utilized over 16 separate GoPros. The folks over at GoPro have finally decided to release a production version of the apparatus that'll be available for purchase. Called the Odyssey panoramic capture rig, it features 16 synchronized GoPro HERO4 Black cameras recording 8K video at 30fps.

The Google Jump 360° Camera Rig Uses 16 GoPros

Google today announced a new virtual reality system called Jump that uses a special new camera rig created in partnership with GoPro. It's a crazy-looking 360-degree camera array that uses 16 separate GoPro cameras.

DIY: How to Build a Wooden Overhead Camera Rig

Having an overhead camera rig can be useful for certain types of photography, including product shots, how-to images, and food photos. If you enjoy the challenge and joy of building your own equipment when you can, an overhead rig is another opportunity to do so. You can create one with some cheap materials and some basic workshop skills.

This Trippy Music Video Was Made with a Circular Rig of DSLRs and Clever Editing

Photographer and film director Naren Wilks created this mind-bending music video by arranging DSLRs around a circular green screen room. When the perspectives of the cameras are combined and synchronized, a "rotationally symmetric, kaleidoscopic world" is created. The song is "Fear & Delight" from the album Puppet Loosely Strung by The Correspondents.

Vu Booth Rig Lets You Quickly and Easily Turn Your Gear Into a Photo Booth

It's not uncommon these days for photographers to want to add a photo booth option to their offerings. In the past, we've seen everything from an awesome VW Photo Bus, to a portable battery-powered option, to an Instagram-inspired DIY project.

The Vu Booth is a rig that offers yet another approach. Made up of 4 separate parts, it allows you to put together your SLR, a monitor, tripod and a wireless trigger into a ready-to-use photo booth.

Create 360° Photos and Video Easily With 360Heros’ Plug-and-Play GoPro Holders

360-degree photos and videos are a niche market, but one that is growing. The ability to capture every angle, all at once, is intriguing to many photographers and videographers, but doing so is anything but simple. 360Heros, a pioneer in the field of 360° video, is trying to change that.

The company has come out with a set of patent-pending GoPro holders that promise to make it much easier to take 360° panoramic photos and video, and they've launched a Kickstarter campaign in order to bring the idea to fruition.

Digitizing Your Film Using Your DSLR

With the cost of my local neg scanner in London being £40/hour for a Hasselblad Flextight, I have been digitising using a DSLR for a quite a while. The results can be extremely good as long as a little time is put into the setup to begin with.

Focus Stacking Macro Photographs with a Hacked Flatbed Scanner

Focus stacking is when you combine multiple photographs of different focus distances in order to obtain a single photo with a much greater depth of field than any of the individual shots. This can be done by turning the zoom ring on your lens, but this can be difficult to control (especially for highly magnified photos). It can also be done using special rigs designed for the purpose, but those are generally quite pricey.

Photographer and software engineer David Hunt recently came up with the brilliant idea of turning an old flatbed scanner into a macro rail for shooting focus-stacking photos.

Freezing Time and Space Using a Bullet-Time Rig of 100 Digital Cameras

Last week we shared a guest post by photographer Martin Legeer on how he built a Matrix-style bullet-time camera rig using 50 Canon DSLRs. Shortly afterward, Greek photographer Theodoros Tziatzios of Real Creations sent an email telling us about his own camera rig projects, which use double the number of cameras.

That's right: a camera rig with 100 cameras for extremely smooth 360-degree views of subjects that freeze time and space.

How I Created a Matrix Bullet Time-Style Rig With 50 DSLRs

Back in March, a client for whom I’ve done some light consulting work asked me if it was possible to capture a 360-degree-image that can be rotated afterwards. I said of course, but didn’t think that much about the consequences -- it's a project that would wake me up at nights for the next few months.