repetition

Photography Composition Tip and Assignment: Embrace Repetition

Are you wanting to get out and create photos, but don’t know where to start? Let me help with that. I'll give you an assignment that will help you by providing a framework and a structure for getting your camera off the shelf.

Capturing Compelling Compositions

Every great photograph consists of three key elements. First and foremost composition, then lighting and, of course, the moment. Look at any great image and you’ll notice these elements.

Photos of the Colossal Duga-3 Radar System Built by the Soviet Union

Duga-3 is a radar system set up by the Soviet Union in the 1970s as part of the nation's anti-ballistic missile early warning system. Although official operations were ended in 1989, the gigantic antenna of the original Duga-3 still dominates the countryside near Chernobyl, Ukraine.

Photographer Peter Franc recently traveled to Ukraine to see and photograph the radio transmitter.

Beautiful Photographs of Patterns Seen from a Helicopter

Aerial photographer Stephan Zirwes shoots amazing images of patterns and repetition seen in landscapes while looking straight down from a helicopter. From his perspective, things like cars, shipping containers, and people blend together into abstract designs.

Aerial Photographs Showing Patterns and Repetition

Alex MacLean is a Massachusetts-based photographer and pilot who uses his dual interests to create epic aerial photographs.

Alex MacLean has flown his plane over much of the United States documenting the landscape. Trained as an architect, he has portrayed the history and evolution of the land from vast agricultural patterns to city grids, recording changes brought about by human intervention and natural processes. His powerful and descriptive images provide clues to understanding the relationship between the natural and constructed environments.

Photos Showing the Bewildering Array of Choices on Store Shelves

Choices is a Warhol-esque (or Gursky-esque) project by photographer Richard Stultz, who visited various stores to document the mind-numbingly large number of choices consumers are faced while shopping. He states,

When we shop, we are presented with aisles of thousands of different products. There are shelves with an endless variety of similar items, often just a variation on the ones next to them. Other shelves display large quantities of identical products. We may find 50 types of beer, hundreds of jars of bleach, or graphic displays of soap. There are cans of dog food with descriptions that sound as appetizing as anything we might cook for ourselves. There are so many shades of hair coloring that we can’t distinguish between many of them.

Beyond the astounding quantity and selection, retail displays are often visually interesting with striking design elements, color, and repetitive patterns. But as we shop and try to find the perfect product, we often don’t see the perverse beauty of these choices.