protest

Photo Editors Weigh In on Jonathan Bachman’s Iconic Protest Photo

Amidst a barrage of violent imagery in the past week graphically illustrating the deaths of Alton Sterling, Philando Castile, and five Dallas police officers, Jonathan Bachman’s image of a protest in Baton Rouge has emerged as iconic.

Viral Photo of Woman in Protest Being Called ‘Iconic’

Of all the photos emerging from the Black Lives Matter protests around the United States, one particular shot is getting widespread attention and praise. Reuters photographer Jonathan Bachman captured a powerful shot of a black woman standing in a street as two police officers in riot gear approach to arrest her.

B&H Slammed with Accusations of Mistreatment and Discrimination

B&H is one of the biggest retail names in the world of photography, but it's also the one at the center of a new controversy after nearly 200 workers launched a campaign to unionize. The disgruntled employees accuse the photo retail giant of widespread racial discrimination, wage theft, and unsafe working conditions inside the Brooklyn-based warehouses.

Europe’s Best-Selling Newspaper Leaves Out Photos

Europe's largest newspaper, the Bild of Germany, has published an unusual print edition that left out all photographs from its pages. The bold move is apparently a response to reader backlash after the paper published photos of Alan Kurdi, the 3-year-old Syrian refugee who drowned in the Mediterranean Sea.

The paper is saying that "the world must see the truth," and hoping that by leaving out photos, people will realize the importance of photography in bringing about change.

Newspaper Sends Cartoonist to Foo Fighters Concert to Protest Photo Contract

The Washington City Paper recently decided to boycott the Foo Fighters' restrictive concert photo contract by buying photos from fans instead. Now a different paper is protesting that same contract in a much different way.

This past weekend, the Quebec newspaper Le Soleil decided to send a cartoon sketch artist to cover a Foo Fighters' concert instead of putting a photographer in the media area.

Newspaper Rejects Foo Fighters Photo Contract, Will Buy Fan Photos Instead

There's a revolution brewing in the world of concert photography. After photographer Jason Sheldon penned a viral open letter to speak out against Taylor Swift's concert photo contract, a major Irish newspaper decided to boycott photos at Swift's recent concert. Now a Washington newspaper has followed suit with another major player in the music industry: the Foo Fighters.

The Washington City Paper says it won't be sending a photographer to this weekend's Foo Fighter concert due to the fact that the band's contract "sucks." Instead, the paper hopes to buy photos directly from fans who attend the show.

Video: Cameraman Accused of ‘Repeatedly Hitting’ Police with His Camera Did No Such Thing

While covering the "re-occupation” protest in Mong Kok on Thursday night, an Apple Daily cameraman was arrested by police after he allegedly assaulted a police officer with his camera and then resisted arrest.

There's just one problem with this story, told to the press by police: it's not true. The video above captured by a South China Morning Post reporter paints a very different picture.

This is What a Photographers Protest Looks Like

A UK-based amateur photographer named Bob Riach was stopped outside a shopping center in East Yorkshire last week by a security guard. Riach was attempting to take some nighttime shots of the complex when the guard confronted him and told him that his photography wasn't allowed due to the complex, citing concerns of an attack by ISIS.

This week a group of photographers decided to stage a protest in support of Riach and photographers' rights.

‘Head Shots’ Photo Series Parodies Violent Posters by Making the Photog the Victim

Artist Jon Burgerman thinks there are too many violent film posters greeting us everywhere we go. These posters of movie and TV show characters holding weapons are all too common, and most of them show the protagonist brandishing their weapon right at the viewer.

And so, Burgerman decided to fight back using a little bit of fake blood, a sense of humor and photography.

A Cadet Face-Down in a Forest of Legs

Reuters photographer Jose Miguel Gomez was recently covering the 121st anniversary of the National Police in Colombia when he spotted a cadet lying face down amidst her peers. He photographed the apparently unconscious policewoman with his 400mm lens for five minutes before she was finally carried away, and wondered why it took so long for help to arrive.

YouTube Offers Face Blurring Technology

YouTube just announced a useful new feature: an easy face blur option. The announcement says the feature is aimed for news and human rights agencies to protect privacy and identities especially if posting images of activists who may need to remain anonymous or if minors are present in the videos and privacy is a concern.

Soccer Club Bans Photographers, Newspaper Uses Cartoonist Instead

English soccer (football) club Southampton F.C. revealed a plan last week to deny press accreditation for photojournalists this season, and instead to force publications to purchase photographs from a single approved source, a photo agency called The Digital South.

Needless to say, this didn't go over well with newspapers, and one in particular -- The Plymouth Herald -- came up with a creative way to protest the decision. Rather than purchase approved photographs, they commissioned city historian Chris Robinson to cover a recent match with Argyle using cartoons (reminds us of a criminal trial).