paris

Eerily Beautiful Photos of Utopian Housing Projects in Paris

Between the 1950s and 1980s, large-scale residential districts were built in and around Paris, France, to provide affordable housing for a booming population. Known as "grands ensembles," these sprawling complexes were sometimes poorly planned and constructed, causing some to have many empty units as residents found other places to live. Others, however, remain populated and are bustling with life.

In both cases, there are senior citizens who call the housing projects home. For his project Souvenir d'un Futur, photographer Laurent Kronental documented these strangely beautiful buildings and the seniors who live in them.

This Video Makes Paris Look Like the Fake World of a Movie Set

French travelers and filmmakers Claire & Max have created this new experimental short film titled "Apparences." They shot 4K imagery of Paris using a Panasonic GH4 and 12-28mm lens, and then used clever editing to make the city look like a giant movie set. Real buildings are turned into facades -- fake flat fronts that are propped up with wooden beams.

These Color Photos of Paris Were Shot 100 Years Ago

Back in 1909, a super-rich French banker named Albert Kahn decided to create a photographic record of the world using the new color photography process that had just appeared, the Autochrome Lumière. He commissioned 4 photographers to take their cameras to places all over the world. One of the cities they documented was Paris.

Using Printed Video Game Screenshots to Creatively Juxtapose 1790s and Modern Day Paris

Then & Now style photo series are anything but uncommon, but what if the "then" you want to compare to "now" happened before the invention of photography? You would think that would be a deal-breaker, but one computer graphics manager and gaming enthusiast found a way around this issue.

For his 'Then & Now' series, Damien Hypolite printed out screenshots from the game Assassin's Creed Unity -- which is based during the French Revolution -- and then went around holding them up against modern-day Paris.

Camera-Toting Eagle Released from the Eiffel Tower, Captures Awesome Footage on the Wing

Places like Paris are prime candidates for capturing incredible aerial footage, but where most people would go about this task with a drone (or maybe a replica of the Up! house...) the people at the non-profit FREEDOM took a different approach.

They strapped a Sony Action Cam Mini to the back of a white-tailed eagle named Victor, and let him fly from the observation deck of the Eiffel Tower.

By the Silent Line: Beautiful Photos of a Parisian Railway Being Reclaimed by Nature

Photographer Pierre Folk has spent 3 years documenting the same, 20-mile long stretch of Parisian railway with his 4x5 view camera... but he's not doing it because of the trains. No, in fact, no trains have run on this railway in for 80 years.

The photos are Folk's way of examining the complex relationship between society and environment.

These Photographs of Parisian Rooftops Look Like Abstract Paintings

Despite living in one of the most photographed locations on earth, Michael Wolf has never been short of creative, unique ideas. Be it photographing street view scenes or, in this case, showing off his incredible composition skill with photographs of Parisian rooftops that look like two-dimensional, abstract paintings.

Stunning Video of Paris Captured Through the Viewfinder of an Old Pentax 67

If this video doesn't make you want to go out and buy a Pentax 67, nothing will. Paris is beautiful enough as-is, but there's something about exploring it through the viewfinder of a classic medium format camera that will tug at your photographic heartstrings and have you nostalgic for the good ol' days.

Paris Officials Ask Tourists to Ditch the ‘Love Locks’ and Take a Selfie Instead

Ever since 2008, lovers from around the world -- about half of whom, statistically speaking, have probably broken up by now... -- have pledged their eternal love to each other by attaching a lock to the Pont des Arts bridge and throwing the key in the Seine.

It's sweet. It's romantic. It's symbolic. Unfortunately, it's also starting to put an unacceptable strain on the bridge, and so Parisian officials are launching a campaign that seeks to replace love locks with a fleeting 21st century alternative: the selfie.

Dysturb: Hard-to-Swallow Photojournalism Hits the Streets of Paris

What do you do when the usual outlets for photographic media choose not to show images you risked your life to capture? What is the next best way to make sure the world sees what is really happening?

It's these questions that led French photojournalist Pierre Terdjman and his buddies to create something called Dysturb, a project that plasters ignored, hard-hitting and hard-to-swallow photojournalism all over the streets of Paris.

Hilarious Portraits of People Getting Milk Thrown in Their Faces

We've seen milk used as a prop in photoshoots before, but never quite like how Paris-based photographer Alexander JE Bradley goes about using it. Profiled in the latest The Weekly Flickr installment, Alexander goes around splashing people with milk and capturing silly, moo-ving images in the process.

Beautiful Pinhole Time-Lapses Captured Inside Camera Obscura Rooms

There's nothing new about time-lapse photography, and calling the camera obscura new borders on insanity, but when you put the two together you get a pretty cool combination that might just qualify as novel, if not unique.

That's what photographers Romain Alary and Antoine Levi have created with their series of "pinhole movies," shot time-lapse style inside massive camera obscura rooms in Paris, India, and even inside a boat cabin.

Gutsy Photog Rappels Down Skyscrapers to Capture Stunning Architecture Shots

Architecture shots are often taken from one of three places: the ground, the roof, or inside a building looking out. That's because the only real alternative after that is to take your photos from outside the building, while being on neither the roof nor the ground.

If that sounds like something only Peter Parker ever managed, think again. Parisian photographer Carlos Ayesta's Vertical Architecture photos take advantage of a vantage point once reserved for Spiderman.