microscopic

Engineering Photography Beautifully Reveals the Intersection of Science and Art

From images of graphene flowers and foam to a portrait of a self-taught engineer fixing one of his elephant pumps that is providing clean water for a village in Malawi, the winning images and other impressive entrants in the University of Cambridge Department of Engineering's photography competition beautifully illustrate how art, science, and humanity mesh.

Captivating TED Talk on the Unseen Worlds that Time-Lapse, Microscopic Imagery and Slow Motion Reveal

The intersection of Science, Technology and Art, at least according to renowned filmmaker and time-lapse photographer Louie Schwartzberg, is curiosity and wonder. And in the TED talk above, he makes the case for how few things pique that curiosity and inspire that wonder like the "hidden miracles of the natural world" that time-lapse, slow motion and microscopic imagery reveal.

Tiny, Lensless Sensor May Someday Turn Any Device Into a Rudimentary Camera

This latest device from technology licensing company Rambus goes to show: when you combine information-gathering sensors with powerful algorithms, you can yield some incredible results.

Developed by research scientist Patrick Gill, this 200 micron diameter glass sensor is capable of capturing an image of remarkable quality for its size. Etched with a spiral pattern, the light reflecting off of whatever object is being "photographed" is transferred as a pattern, in the form of spherical light, to the CMOS sensor.

Breathtaking Microscope Photos of Moth & Butterfly Wings

The thing about nature is that, if you look close enough at just about anything, you're bound to find a beauty and symmetry that defies description. In the case of Linden Gledhill's microscope photos of butterfly wings, he simply discovered another level of beauty in something that already captures many of our imaginations.

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Footage of Plants and Insects Magnified Thousands of Times

They look as if they're a complete fabrication of one's imagination, but they aren't. German photographer Stefan Diller has managed to create worlds using microscopic images of plant and insect life, giving us a view of what our eyes can't quite see. The technology, called nanoflight, is described as "a revolutionary new way to visualize structures of the microworld," and has "the ability to move a virtual camera in eight degrees of freedom around the specimen."

Microscopic Time-Lapse Music Video Put Together from 10,000 Tiny Pictures

For his most recent album Immunity, musician Jon Hopkins wanted to create visuals that would match the colors he sees in his mind when he's composing his music. The thing was, he would rather they not be computer generated -- his music is organic, he wanted the visuals to match.

Enter photographer Linden Gledhill and art director Craig Ward. In partnership with The Creators Project, they came up with a solution: use abstract imagery of things that happen on a microscopic scale.

What a DSLR’s CMOS Sensor Looks Like Under a Microscope

Jack over at the astrophotography blog The Landingfield has published a series of photographs showing what a digital camera's CMOS sensor looks like when viewed through a microscope. The sensor (seen above) was taken from a broken Nikon D2H -- a DSLR from back in the early 2000s.