london

Street Artists ‘Erase’ London Through Their Creative Photoshop Street Art

Street artists can be some of the cheekiest people around. Their approach to satire, be it politically motivated or otherwise, is often worth a laugh or two... if not a round of applause. The latest project in London by Guus Ter Beek and Tayfun Sarier is no exception. They've taken Photoshop's erase tool quite literally into the real world to great effect.

London Then and Now Video Puts Identical Footage from 1927 and 2013 Side-by-Side

A couple of times last year, we had the chance to share with you amazing color film footage shot all the way back in the 1920s by filmmaker and cinematographer Claude Friese-Greene. His father had invented the bicolour technique of capturing color film, and using this technique Friese-Greene captured beautiful footage of 1920's Britain for his collection of films The Open Road.

The most famous of these films were shot in London, at the end of Friese-Greene's two-year roadtrip around Britain; and now, 86 years later, we can compare his footage with the same shots taken in present day thanks to filmmaker Simon Smith.

Time-Lapse Captures the Train Ride from London to Brighton in 1953, ’83 and 2013

When the BBC first captured the non-stop train ride from London to Brighton in 1953, it was simply because they wanted to show how the magic of time-lapse photography could get a Londoner to the seaside in only four minutes.

When 1983 came along, they decided to re-capture the journey to see the differences. And now, in 2013, it only seemed appropriate to continue the every-30-years tradition and capture the trip once again.

19th Century London Street Photography by John Thomson

There's some debate over who the "father" of street photography was. Although Frenchman Eugene Atget is often granted this title, his work was mainly architectural, putting people second.

But there's another, lesser-known name that enters the picture (pardon the pun) as early as if not earlier than Atget: a Scotsman by the name of John Thomson.

600,000-Pixel-Wide Tokyo Panorama is the 2nd Largest Photo Ever Made

Do you remember the 320-gigapixel photo taken from atop the BT Tower in London? That 360° panorama, shot by Founder of 360-cities Jeffrey Martin, holds the title of world's largest photo. But just because you have the top spot, doesn't mean you have to stop.

Another of Martin's creations, this one shot from the lower observation deck of the Tokyo Tower, has earned him the number two spot as well.

Amazing Color Footage of Britain from the 1920s

About a month ago, we shared some stunning footage that showed what London was like all the way back in 1926. The original filming was done by Claude Friese-Greene, whose father William invented the 'Biocolour' technique of capturing color film footage.

That particular video was a compilation of snippets that Friese-Greene had filmed in London when he returned form a 2-year journey. He called the final product The Open Road, and it was a 26-part series that took him all over Britain. Fortunately for us, much of it has now been digitized and uploaded bit-by-bit to YouTube by The BFI National Archive.

DigitalRev Pits Film Vs Digital in a 36-Hour Photo Tour of London

For their most recent international foray, the DigitalRev producers decided to send Kai, Lok and Alamby on a 36-hour trek across London to take photos. They were tasked with travelling to and photographing 10 of London's best known landmarks, using old film SLRs on day one, and digital cameras the next.

Old Color Footage Shows What London Looked Like Back in 1926

Want to see what London looked like back in the year 1926? Check out this beautiful color footage shot in various London locations by Claude Friese-Greene, an early British pioneer of film. Frisse-Greene created a series of travelogues nearly 90 years ago using a color process developed by his father William Friese-Greene.

A Visual Journey That Shows the Cookie-Cutter Facades of Homes in London

When photographer Callum Cooper moved from Melbourne, Australia to London, England, one of the things that caught his eye was the uniformity (or "conformity") seen in the city's residential areas. Along a street, multiple buildings would have exactly the same architecture, and if it weren't for the minor differences in the facades, some of them can hardly be distinguished from one another.

Cooper then came up with the idea of exploring this phenomenon using photographs -- photos that would become a "structuralist film."

320-Gigapixel London Panorama Breaks Record for Largest Panoramic Photo

The BT Tower panorama, created by stitching together 48,640 images taken with 7 Canon EOS 7Ds, has officially broken the record for the world's largest panoramic photo. It was taken from atop the BT Tower in London, and you can see a tiny version of it at the top, but the real thing offers a massive, browsable 360-degree view of London in extreme detail.

David Burnett’s Speed Graphic Photos of the London 2012 Olympics

Last August, we wrote about how renowned photojournalist David Burnett was spotted using a large format camera at the London Olympics. If you've been wondering how the photographs turned out, today's your lucky day.

Here's an inside look at how Burnett's project came to be, and the beautiful images that resulted.

London’s Incredible Diversity Captured In Photos of Bus Stops

Between 2001 and 2005, photographer Richard Hooker visited various bus stops across London and shot film photographs of the people waiting for their rides to arrive. The 136 photographs he captured show the city's incredible cultural diversity, explore how people relate to one another in confined spaces, and offer small peeks into personal lives.

Canon’s Drool-Worthy Gear Room at the London Olympics

Welcome to camera gear heaven: here's a glimpse inside the Canon Professional Services office at the London 2012 Olympics. It's a room that's absolutely stuffed with cameras, lenses, and accessories from floor to ceiling. The Canon 1D X hasn't been released to the general public yet, but this room has hundreds of them!