lensadapter

This is a Prototype of an Electronically-Controlled ND Filter Lens Adapter

At the IBC 2015 trade show in Amsterdam, which just wrapped up a couple of days ago, the camera gear company Genus was showing off a prototype of a groundbreaking new product: an electronically controlled neutral density (ND) filter adapter. It was a Canon EF to Sony E lens adapter that had a dial that lets you adjust the level of ND filtration electronically.

Dan Chung of News Shooter filmed the short video above in which Genus shows off the prototype. Chung calls it "one of the most impressive things we saw at IBC this year," and "the holy grail of DSLR filmmaking."

Sensor Stack Thickness: When Does It Matter?

The first post I made on sensor-stack thickness wallowed deeply in PhotoGeekery. This one is meant to be of practical use so I’ll try to leave the Geek stuff out. We’ll start with the simple facts.

Glass in the Path: Why Using Adapters May Hurt Your Image Quality

NOTE: This is a Geek Post. If you aren’t into geeky photo measurements, or into adapting lenses from one brand of camera to another, you’ll not be interested.

A year or two ago, I wrote a blog post where I basically showed lenses shot on adapters on other cameras aren’t acceptable for testing. If you run them through Imatest the results aren’t accurate. I suggested that reviewers shouldn’t test lenses on adapters, although obviously adapters are a great way to use interesting lenses to take pictures.

Multi-Mount Lets You Use Bayonet Lenses on Your Pentax DSLR Without an Adapter

To the world of lens mount adapters comes a new creation by Adaptist. Called the Pentax K+ Multi-Mount, this adapter takes a unique approach to the mounting system allowing you to attach Nikon F-mount, Olympus OM-mount, Contax/Yashica C/Y-mount and Konica AR-mount lenses (in addition to the standard K-mount, of course) to your Pentax DSLR, all within this one integrated solution.

Olympus Apparently Working on a FT-to-MFT Adapter with Built-In AF and IS

Olympus currently offers a $144 adapter called the MMF-2 for photographers who want to use an existing collection of Four Thirds-mount lenses on a Micro Four Thirds camera. The accessory makes the lenses mountable and acts as a middleman between the lenses and the cameras, but its features pretty much end there. It appears that Olympus is working on a much fancier adapter: one that actually contains lens elements and contains focusing/stabilization features as well.