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These Before and After Photos Show How Glaciers in the US Are Melting

Over the past several years, the U.S. Geological Survey has been shooting a "Repeat Photography" project in various locations to show how glacier ice has been retreating over the past century. Using photos from the late 1800s and early 1900s as references, photographers are rephotographing those same scenes to show how things have changed (and are changing).

Kluane Glaciers

The power of the slowly moving ice could be felt even from our lofty vantage point in the small, single-engine plane. A vast river of glacial ice stretched far into the horizon. Treeless mountains reared above us on both sides as we soared up the valley, their grey stone walls loosely robed in a white frock of snow, even though it was the height of summer.

The Gem-Like Turquoise Ice Found on Lake Baikal

Russian photographer Alexey Trofimov calls Lake Baikal "the gem that does not need to be cut." It's the oldest, largest, deepest, and clearest freshwater lake in the world. Every winter, as temperatures plummet to well below zero, the crystal clear lake water forms brilliant gem-like ice that glimmers in the sunlight.

Photos of Beautiful Ice Sculptures That Formed After a Windy Mountain Storm

Mount Javornik in Slovenia was recently battered by more than a week of strong winds and freezing fog. After the storm was safely past, weather photographer Marko Korosec decided to trek up the popular ski destination to see what he would find.

When he got up the mountain, he found crazy and beautiful ice structures formed by the intense weather. Many of the formations reminded Korosec of "extraterrestrial creatures like in the Sci-Fi movies," he says.

Game of Thrones Season 1 Poster Recreated with Huge Camera Lenses Instead of Swords

One afternoon, while hanging out with his coworkers at Bozeman Camera, photographer Tanner Johnson and his friend Beau Larson had an idea: they decided to recreate the Game of Thrones Season 1 poster with camera gear instead of swords.

From the Iron Throne to the Stark family's sword 'Ice,' all of the sharp pointing things used to kill people were replaced with huge lenses to create an awesome photographic version.

Melting Away: A Decade of Arctic and Antarctic Photography by Camille Seaman

More than a decade ago, photographer Camille Seaman visited Alaska, Svalbard and Antarctica, and thus began a love affair with the polar regions that spanned 10 years and tens of thousands of photographs.

Now, the best of her images of icebergs, animals, and Arctic and Antarctic landscapes are being compiled into the photo book Melting Away, poised to be released just as the debate over climate change and its impact reaches a fever pitch.

Unique Wedding Photographs Taken Inside an Ice Cave in Alaska

We promise we didn't plan it, but after sharing Josh Newton's amazing wildfire wedding photographs last month, we've managed to stumble across their antithesis today.

Last month it was wedding photos in front of a raging wildfire. This month we give you another beautifully-shot set of wedding pictures, this time taken inside a bonafide, had-to-kayak-to-get-there ice cave.

Photographing the Jaw-Dropping ‘Crystal Caves’ of Iceland

If there is only one way for me to describe Iceland, it would be “Monumental Scale Shock”. The country really borders on the extreme. The entire country’s population of 320,137 (as of 2012) is less than one half of Boston’s and two-thirds of everyone lives in the capital, Reykjavik. It's north of NYC by almost all of Canada, but it is warmer by about ten degrees in the winter. And 85% of the country is on renewable energy (Volcanic and Water) as compared to the 13.2% for the US.

“Snow Flowers” on the Front of a Lens

Apparently if you shoot in certain environments that are cold enough, beautiful patterns of snow and ice form on the front element of your lens. This is what photographer Alessandro Della Bella's glass looked like as he was shooting at an altitude of around 10,000 feet on Mount Titlis in temperatures of around 1° F.

Photographs of Clothing and Accessories Frozen in Large Blocks of Ice

Fashion company Pierre Cardin did a marketing campaign earlier this year that revolved around the slogan: "Simply Cool." It enlisted the help of Brazilian art director Cláudia Xavier and luxury still life photographer Norimich Inoguchi for a series of advertising photographs. The creatives decided to convey that "it's cool to wear Pierre Cardin" in a very literal way: they photographed various clothing items and accessories frozen into large blocks of ice.