hongkong

Abstract Photographs of Hong Kong’s Neon Signs

At first glance, photographer Rainer Torrado's "Eye Carry the Night" may look to you like a strange grid of lines and colors. They're actually photos of neon signs.

Instead of photographing the design on the face of the signs, Torrado took his camera directly beneath each one, capturing what the displays look like from an angle that most people ignore.

Filipino Domestic Worker Earns Prestigious Magnum Fellowship for Her Photography

For the past 10 years, 27-year-old Xyza Cruz Bacani has been working as a domestic worker for a wealthy Chinese family in Hong Kong. On her days off, she brings her camera onto her city's sidewalks and captures impressive street photos.

Yesterday, Bacani's life took a dramatic turn: she was announced as a recipient of the 2015 Human Rights Fellowship by the Magnum Foundation, a prestigious scholarship that will give her the opportunity to study in an intensive, six-week-long program at New York University in NYC.

Video: Cameraman Accused of ‘Repeatedly Hitting’ Police with His Camera Did No Such Thing

While covering the "re-occupation” protest in Mong Kok on Thursday night, an Apple Daily cameraman was arrested by police after he allegedly assaulted a police officer with his camera and then resisted arrest.

There's just one problem with this story, told to the press by police: it's not true. The video above captured by a South China Morning Post reporter paints a very different picture.

Fan Ho’s Fantastic Black-and-White Street Photographs of 1950s Hong Kong

Photographer Ho Fan has been shooting black and white street photography since the 1950s. At the time, he was living in the poor, rundown Central neighborhood of Hong Kong. The streets, filled with food and trinket vendors, captured the recent Shanghai transplant's attention. It was with this fascination that Fan took his camera to the streets, documenting the intriguing life around him.

Hong Kong’s Fake Skyline Banners Allow Tourists to Get Good Shots on Hazy Days

Hong Kong's tourism industry brings in about $37 billion in revenue for the city each year, and many of the tourists who contribute want to get a picture with the beautiful Hong Kong skyline and Victoria Harbor in the background while they're there.

But what are they supposed to do if their only chance to get that shot is on a hazy/smoggy day in Hong Kong? The government has the answer: giant fake skyline banners.

Eye-Popping Photographs of Hong Kong High-Rise Apartment Buildings

With a population of over 7 million people packed into an area of 426 square miles, Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated places in the world. As with other places where development cannot expand horizontally, apartment buildings tend to get taller and taller in order to provide living space for all the inhabitants.

German photographer Michael Wolf decided to capture this population density through a series of photographs studying the architecture of these high rises. The project is titled "Architecture of Density."

Cramped Apartments in Hong Kong Shot From Directly Above

In the middle of last year, The Economist released rankings for the world's most livable cities, and Hong Kong was found at the top. What many people don't know, however, is that there is a percentage of Hong Kong residents living in rather horrid conditions.

In an attempt to draw attention to the issue, human rights organization Society for Community Organization recently commissioned a series of photographs showing what a number of unacceptable living spaces look like when viewed from directly overhead. (Here's a larger version of the photo above.)

The Legality and Ethics of Pointing a Lens Into a Private Residence for Art

Award-winning photographer Michael Wolf is raising some eyebrows with a new photo project titled "Window Watching." The series features photographs of high-rise apartment windows in Hong Kong, offering glimpses into the lives of people living inside the private residences. Basically, Wolf pointed a telephoto lens at open windows to photograph people going about their day-to-day-lives, without their knowledge and consent.

The World’s Largest Collection of Camera Film

Stamps, coins, comic books, and baseball cards. Those are some of the popular things people around the world collect as a hobby. Not Ying Nga (Cecilia) Chow. She collects unprocessed photographic camera film.

Chow, a photography enthusiast based in Hong Kong, China, started collecting different films back in 2008. Since then, she has amassed an impressive collection of over 1,250 different films, ranging from ordinary films that are still in use today, to obscure old Russian films that you'll be hard pressed to find anywhere on Earth. The collection features films by over 100 different brands from 30 different countries.