highspeed

The Challenge of Shooting with High-Speed Cameras

In the 16-minute video above, Gavin Free of the The Slow Mo Guys answers a question he often receives: “Is using a high-speed camera similar to using a normal camera?” The answer is “Yes and No”, and we end up looking into the biggest challenges in using high-speed cameras.

Tips for Photographing an MMA Fighter Smashing Food to Bits

In September I shot a campaign for Nikon using its new D500 camera, in which the brief was to demonstrate how fast, powerful and robust it was. We set about capturing split-second moments of impact, photographing scenes that would otherwise be impossible to see with the naked eye.

Photographing a Archerfish Hunting with an Indoors Setup

This is the archerfish from Asia. These amazing fish have the unusual habit of feeding on land-based insects. Even more unique is their method of hunting their chosen prey: they spit a powerful jet of water at their dinner knocking it from overhanging foliage into the water, where the fish quickly gobbles them up!

This Simple Example Shows the Power of High Speed Sync

High speed sync is a big deal when you're capturing portraits on-location. As photographer Manuel Ortiz shows in this informative video, it can mean the difference between a captivating shot and something full of background distraction.

Watch a Bullet Fly Through 5 Light Bulbs at 62,000 FPS

Cameras can make the invisible, visible. In this case, the magic of slow motion makes it possible to watch as a bullet smashes through 5 lit light bulbs, tearing through the frame at 62,000 frames per second and sending white-hot filament and shards of powdered glass in all directions.

Review: The MIOPS Smart Trigger Makes High Speed Photography a Snap

I've been doing high speed photography for a while, now but I've doing it manually. After some time you get used to the timing but will still miss some of the shots, and with high speed photography you can't afford to miss that one perfect shot. MIOPS is a $239 smart trigger that helps you nail the shot in high speed photography.

The Vela One is 100x Faster than Conventional Strobes, Can Stop a Bullet In Its Tracks

High speed photography is all about fast-flash; the faster your flash, the faster the instant you can adequately freeze on a digital sensor. Modern strobes are pretty good at this, with flash durations as fast as 1/20,000 of a second, but a Bristol-based company Vela Labs is about to take high-speed photography to unheard-of heights.

Introducing the Vela One, ‘the world’s first high speed LED flash' that boasts a flash speed starting at 1/2,000,000 second, or 500 nanoseconds.

This High Speed Camera Can Capture 4K at a Mind-Bending 900fps

One of the biggest challenges of shooting 4K Ultra HD footage is the sheer amount of data you're processing. That's about 30 8MP photos coming into your camera every single second. But the old FOR-A FT-ONE and the new, smaller, FOR-A FT-ONE-S scoff at your measly 30fps.

These cameras, while they definitely don't come cheap, earn every penny of their price tags by capturing 4K footage at up to 900fps.

This is What Little Puppies Look Like When They’re Shaking Off Water

There's a rule of thumb when it comes to viral dog photography: what's cute with dogs is going to be twice as cute when you shrink your subjects down to puppies.

Photographer Seth Casteel did it with Underwater Dogs and the sequel Underwater Puppies, and we are very happy to inform you that animal photographer Carli Davidson recently decided to take her viral SHAKE photos of dogs and create the photo series and book SHAKE Puppies.

Video: Capture Slo-Mo Footage on the Cheap with the Casio EX-F1

Who said you have to drop big bucks to have some high-speed fun? Well, it definitely wasn't Joey Shanks, who recently decided to show the Phantom users out there that they’re not the only ones who can do it.

To do this, Shanks rented a Casio EX-F1 high speed camera for a week. Costing him only $100, he combined its high frame-rate with a healthy dose of water and gunpowder to create some interesting high-speed footage with minimal investment.

DigitalRev Speed Shooter: How to Capture High-Speed Photos of Fire and Water

About a month ago, the folks at DigitalRev TV launched a new series called "Speed Shooter" in which they show you how to take great high-speed shots of various subjects. We didn't get a chance to cover the first episode when it first came out, and so now that episode two has debuted we thought we'd put them together in one.

Hawk Attacking Water Balloon at 4000FPS Makes for Some Incredible Footage

With the rise in popularity and drop in price of high speed cameras, more and more incredible footage is getting captured of events our human brain would otherwise be unable to see in such detail.

And today, we have yet another one of those events, the protagonist being a Goshawk and the victim being a water balloon baited with a piece of the soon-to-be-dinner that, we'll be honest, never stood a chance.

The edgertronic: A Small and Affordable Super Slow-Motion Camera

High resolution, super slow-motion video is usually reserved for movie studios or individuals with very deep pockets. Once the frame rate capabilities reach into the thousands, the price range often hits the tens of thousands.

Two MIT-trained engineers are looking to change all that, and with their new edgertronic super slow motion camera, they've done just that.

ArnoSync: An Impressive DIY High-Speed Insect Photography Rig

There are DIY projects that just about anybody can do -- for example, turning an old film canister into a flashlight -- and there are DIY projects that have a very specific "Y" in mind.

The ArnoSync High-Speed photography rig falls into the latter category. But even if you don't have the engineering prowess to build it yourself, it's still worth taking a look at what this home-brew rig can do.

Friday Morning in Strobe Alley

“Ya wanna see Edgerton’s lab?”

Now, asking a photographer if he would like to see the workspace of the guy who made all those iconic stop-action images of impossibly fast-moving objects was like asking a short-order cook if he’d like to see where they invented the ham and cheese omelet.