highres

A Practical Guide to Creating Superresolution Photos with Photoshop

We’ve seen it in plenty of thriller/crime solver TV shows and movies: upon reviewing some grainy and very low-resolution surveillance footage, someone inevitably asks the technician, “can you zoom in on that and enhance it?” Then, with the quick press of a few masterfully placed keystrokes and bleepy computer sounds, the image is suddenly enhanced with vastly increased resolution and a key plot device is revealed.

Olympus to Make 40MP Sensor Shift Photos Possible During Handheld Shooting

One of the main innovations found in the new Olympus OM-D E-M5 II is its ability to shoot massive 40MP photos with its 16MP sensor by doing "sensor shifting" and combining multiple shots. The main downside, however, is that you need a tripod to make sure the camera doesn't move between shots.

That may soon change: Olympus says its working on making the sensor shift technology work even when the photographer is shooting handheld without stabilization.

Satellite Uses Infrared Photography to See Beneath California Forest Fire Smoke

DigitalGlobe really wants people to get behind their super-high res public imaging satellite, the WorldView-3, and understand just how useful it could be. To that end, they're showing off the satellite's capabilities once again, this time using the onboard infrared sensor to see beneath the smoke of a California forest fire and capture some incredibly detailed images of the inferno.

Hasselblad’s New H5D-200c Multi-Shot Spits Out Massive 200-Megapixel Files

Fair warning: your brain's buffer might have a hard time processing this one. Following in the multi-shot heritage of the old CCD H5D-200MS, Hasselblad has released a CMOS version of the multi-shot behemoth. And like its older brother, it can spit out gargantuan 200MP files thanks to Hassy's proprietary Multi-Shot technology that combines as many as 6 shots into one.

Eric Kim Allowing High-Res Downloads of His Work for Free, Going ‘Open Source’

Street photographer Eric Kim has always believed in the value of 'open source.' Usually a term reserved for software and code, open source is a development model that promotes free public access and redistribution rights for a product.

Much of what Kim has put out into the world -- be they videos or ebooks -- he's made available in the same way: use, alter and share as you'd like. And now, he's adding his photos to the list of things the public has almost unlimited access to.

300-Megapixel Photographs Shot With Single Presses of the Shutter

Remember that 50-gigapixel camera being developed by Duke University scientists? Since we reported on the project last year, researchers have created a spin-off company called Aqueti for bringing the technology "into the world for everyone to experience." The camera they've developed will soon be making public tours, and we're starting to get a peek at what it's capable of.

Coins of the World Photographed Using Europe’s Best Microscope

Did you know that it costs the US Mint 2 cents to produce every 1 cent coin due to the cost of materials and production? Countries such as Canada have already done away with their lowest denomination coins due to their costs and lack of usefulness.

As these "worthless" coins cause debates in their governments about whether or not they should be abolished, photographer Martin John Callanan is on a mission to save them... not as a currency, but rather in photographs.

Google Announces Full Resolution Photo Uploads for Google+

A couple of weeks ago, we shared a hack by photographer Trey Ratcliff that allowed you to upload your photos to Google+ at full resolution by using Google Drive. Android users could already upload full-sized photos from their phone, the hack simply allowed desktop users to do the same.

Fortunately, the hack is no longer necessary now that Google has caught on and integrated the ability right into Google+ itself.

Dropbox iOS App Now Downloads Full-Resolution Photos from the Cloud

If you've been using Dropbox as a photo backup solution and the official iOS app for accessing your images in the cloud, you may have noticed that downloading photos to your device didn't give you the exact files that you wanted. Instead of beaming the full-resolution images to your Camera Roll, the app would shrink photos to a much smaller size to speed up downloading times. A 14MP 4592x3056 photo would only be saved at 960x638, for example.

This week, Dropbox finally updated the app and removed the resolution ceiling from downloads. Now you can save your entire photos from your backup to your iOS device without seeing it pass under a shrink ray.