googleglass

Google Glass Specs Outed: 5 Megapixel Camera and 720p Video

Google has officially announced the specs for its Glass wearable computer/camera. Of interest to readers of this blog is the fact that the camera will be able to capture decent photographs -- at least resolution-wise. It'll be a 5-megapixel camera that has WiFi capabilities. The camera will also be able to capture 720p video and audio.

Could Google Glass Work as a Tool For Street Photography?

Google Glass has received a lot of criticism, particularly when it comes to privacy. Given the fact you can record video and take photos without people noticing, some could call it an opportunity for taking photos without permission. Now, in my spare time, I take photos with a particular interest in is Street Photography. Candid street photography is taking photos of any stranger without permission. Why is there this controversy over Glass when candid photography without permission is a growing genre of photography? That is my question.

Vuzix to Compete with Google in Glasses-Style Camera Market

A new challenger has emerged to face Google Glass in the head-mounted glasses-style camera market. Interactive eyewear company Vuzix unveiled a new product today called the Smart Glasses M100, a camera-equipped Android computer that looks like a cross between a Bluetooth headset that's too long and a microphone that's worn too high.

How Wearable “Sousveillance” Cameras Will Transform Our Society

Have you heard of the term sousveillance? It's the inverse of surveillance: instead of a camera pointed at individuals, individuals wear their own cameras on themselves to document their activities. Wearable-camera pioneer Steve Mann has written a fascinating piece for Time, titled "Eye Am a Camera: Surveillance and Sousveillance in the Glassage", in which he offers his vision of what the future will look like once wearable cameras such as Google Glass (seen above) become ubiquitous.

Tech Journalists’ Initial Impressions of the Google Glass Camera Glasses

Developers who pre-ordered Google's Project Glass glasses for $1,500 won't be receiving them until early 2013, but a number of lucky journalists were recently given the opportunity to take the camera-equipped, augmented reality eye-piece for a test drive. The New York Times' gadget kingmaker David Pogue writes that the device has the potential to be one of the rare devices that introduces a whole new gadget category to the world,

[...] a few things are clear. The speed and power, the tiny size and weight, the clarity and effectiveness of the audio and video, are beyond anything I could have imagined. The company is expending a lot of effort on design — hardware and software — which is absolutely the right approach for something as personal as a wearable gadget

[...] it’s much too soon to predict Google Glass’s success or failure. But it’s easy to see that it has potential no other machine has ever had before — and that Google is shepherding its development in exactly the right way.

A Behind-the-Scenes Look at a Fashion Show Captured by Google Glass

Earlier this week, we wrote about a unique fashion show put on in NYC by DVF that extensively featured Google's Project Glass camera glasses. Google released a video today that provides an interesting look at the show, as recorded by various people wearing the devices.

Experience the DVF Spring 2013 show at New York Fashion Week through the eyes of the people who made it happen—the stylists, the models and Diane von Furstenberg herself. All the footage you see here was filmed using only Glass, Google's latest technology that lets you capture moments from a unique, new perspective. See what happens when fashion and technology come together like you've never seen before.

It's interesting seeing what goes on behind the scenes at a fashion show, especially from the diverse perspectives see in this video (glasses were given to everyone from the designer herself to the cameramen at the back of the runway room).

Google Glass Camera Glasses Used by Runway Models as a Fashion Accessory

If Google's vision of the future of photography comes to pass, we'll soon find ourselves in a world in which camera glasses are worn around as an everyday fashion accessory. Perhaps in an effort to make this idea easier to stomach, Google partnered up with luxury fashion company Diane von Fürstenberg (DVF) today for the label's Spring 2013 fashion show, equipping people on and around the runway with its high-tech glasses. Glass wearers included runway models, Google founder Sergey Brin, and designer Diane von Furstenberg herself.

Google Dubs Project Glass Pre-Orderers “Explorers,” Promises Secret Updates

It looks like at least one group of people will be in-the-know regarding Google's Project Glass, a group that has been dubbed "Glass Explorers" by the company's co-founder Sergey Brin. The group is made up of all the pre-orderers from Google's I/O event earlier this year who shelled out $1,500 to make sure they get their hands on the first of the wearable camera/computers.

Fortunately for them, that $1,500 also bought them acces to exclusive product updates, invites to events, and access to Google+ hangouts -- a veritable secret club missing only the secret password for access to the secret treehouse clubhouse.

Is the World Ready for Wearable Cameras (Or Cyborgs)?

Professor and self-proclaimed cyborg Steve Mann created an eye and memory-aid device he calls the EyeTap Digital Glass. The EyeTap, worn by Mann above on the left, is a wearable device that is similar to Google Eye, pictured right, but he's been making them at home since the 1980s. The goal of his project is to use images to aid memory, or even to augment the memories of people with Alzheimer's Disease or who simply want to preserve their memories more permanently. However, a recent misunderstanding over Mann's technology allegedly caused a confrontation between Mann and several employees at a Paris McDonald's restaurant.

Google Glass Demoed at I/O, Preorders Pegged at $1,500

Google demoed its much-hyped Project Glass at its I/O conference today, showing how the sleek camera-equipped "goggles" could one day allow point-of-view photos and videos to be beamed directly to others through the Internet. Four skydivers wearing the glasses beamed footage of their jump live through Google+ to the attendees in the SF conference center (see above video). They then "passed the baton" onto a group of bikers who did some tricks on the roof and then biked into the center, showing that the footage was in fact live.

Instaglasses: Concept Glasses That Apply Your Filter Of Choice to Everyday Life

You know society has gone a little filter-crazy when a concept for Instagram glasses shows up on the scene, but we have to admit that Instaglasses make for an interesting idea. The basic premise is that Instagram fanatics aficionados would be able to use these to always see the world in filters. When they then glimpsed a scene that looked especially artsy with the Amaro or Inkwell filters applied, they could use a button on the side of the glasses to capture and upload that image to Instagram.

Google Shows Off Camera Glasses and More Sample Photos at Conference

Google Glass team member Max Braun took to the stage at the Google+ Photography Conference yesterday to show off a prototype device, talk about the project's potential impact in photography, and show off some new sample photographs. He states,

We see glass as an evolution of cell phone photography. It's the next step of the camera that's always with you. It's not meant to replace your professional camera anytime soon [...] We think that photography in Glass is going to open up a whole range of pictures that would not have been possible otherwise.

The Google Glass portion of the talk begins at the 47 minute mark in the video above.