football

Way Beyond the Deadline: Shooting ASU Football’s Ad Campaign

There are deadlines and then there are deadlines… this is the latter.

Arizona State University’s advertising campaign is one that I have now shot for 10 years. It is one that I always use to push the logistical boundaries that I had previously been inflexible towards, for the sake of art and knowledge. Photographing it is a practice in embracing the unknown and evaluating previously conceived notions of what is possible and what is not. This year’s photoshoot existed well within the impossible…

Roaming the Stadium With My Camera During an NFL Football Game

Last month, I covered an NFL football game in which I had freedom to roam once what I shot what I needed for ESPN the Magazine (that story to be published this month).

I was done with my pregame shoot and portrait session the night prior, and so I had a decision to make: drive four hours home or spend four hours over four quarters making pictures at a game that, in the terms of the NFL this season, was a little off the grid.

Photographers Get Swarmed by Football Team After Crazy Finish

Georgia Tech pulled off a crazy 22-16 win over the #9 ranked Florida State football team this past Saturday after a field goal attempt for the win was blocked and returned 78 yards for a touchdown with no time remaining.

A number of photographers found themselves in the end zone as the memorable play unfolded -- some got shots, while others got swarmed.

NFL Photographer Shoots Game with iPhone 6S Plus

This past weekend, GottaBeMobile sent sports photographer Andrew Weber to the Sunday Night Football game between the Denver Broncos and the Detroit Lions. Instead of the $12,000 in gear that Weber normally carries into stadiums, he was asked to shoot everything with just an iPhone 6S Plus.

The resulting photos offer a look at what the new iPhone's camera can and can't do when shooting top-level athletes in a (relatively) dark and action-packed environment.

Monopods No Longer Allowed at OU Football Games Because of Lens Crushing Incident

Last weekend, Tulsa World photojournalist Mike Simons made headlines for all the wrong reasons when Oklahoma football player Sterling Shepard took a painful fall onto Simons' Canon telephoto lens, snapping it in half.

The incident prompted criticism from OU coach Bob Stoop, a public apology from Simons, and now, a new set of rules for photographers covering football games handed down by the powers that be at OU.

This is What Happens When a Football Player Lands on a $10,499 Canon Lens

One of the stranger stories that occurred in the world of photography this past weekend was when Oklahoma football player Sterling Shepard crash landed on a Canon telephoto lens, snapping it into two pieces.

Now that the dust is settled, the photographer has come forward with his account of the incident and an apology to the player.

Video: Football Player Falls On and Snaps Canon Telephoto Lens in Half on the Sideline

While diving for a catch at the back of end zone during today's game against Kansas State, Oklahoma wide receiver Sterling Shepard landed on something not-so-soft, but oh-so-very-expensive on the sideline: what looks to be a Canon 1DX attached to either a 400mm f/2.8L or a 500mm f/4L.

Shepard, we're happy to report, is okay. The lens... she's gone.

Manchester United Bans Fans From Using iPads, Tablets to Snap Photos During Games

Manchester United, one of the most prestigious teams in the English Premier League, has officially banned fans from bringing iPads and other large tablet devices to Old Trafford, their 75,000 capacity stadium. While definitive evidence is scarce, it’s believed the reason is that too many fans are snapping up photos with their devices, obstructing the views of those around them.

Photoshop Fail: News Outlet Tried to Make the Crowd Look More Pro-Madrid at ‘The Big House’

Marca edited the stadium photo to add more white shirts: pic.twitter.com/Bd1ZViU8qj [@kantinu]

— Rafael Hernández (@RafaelH117) August 2, 2014

 

This weekend, two of soccer's biggest teams brought their talents to 'The Big House,' in Ann Arbor, Michigan, to host what was the largest attendance record for a soccer game on US soil. It was Manchester United vs. Real Madrid and despite the efforts from both clubs, Manchester United came out on top, with a 3–1 victory.

But, despite a victory, an embarrassing photoshop fail from Spanish media outlet, Marca, has left Manchester United fans a bit upset. In an overhead photograph of the game, shared by Manchester United on Twitter, Marca decided it would attempt to diminish the crowd presence of Manchester United fans by desaturating the shirts of those in the stands of the Big House.

Uruguay Footballer Accused of Biting Rival Player Claims Photoshop is Involved

This has got to be one of the stranger Photoshop controversies we've ever run across. Usually, Photoshop in the mainstream news means that some model or celebrity has been poorly altered on a magazine cover, but this time around, it's a football star going after Photoshop, saying it's being used in a smear campaign against him.

Sports Photographer Receives Well-Wishes from Athletes World-Wide After Accident

@chadders_dm special thanks to @FAMediaOps #gwsMarc they win the prize no question pic.twitter.com/ueDxKB2HgQ
— Dickie Pelham (@DickiePelham) June 13, 2014

On the tenth of April, The Times chief sports photographer Marc Aspland was in a terrible car accident. The crash, which occurred in Harpenden, Hertfordshire, left him with brain hemorrhaging, nerve damage and two broken collarbones.

It was these injuries that led to Aspland missing out on two of the world’s largest sporting events, Wimbledon and the World Cup. But after news of the photographer unable to make it to these events spread about, a number of athletes started to team up to send support his way. Using the hashtag #gwsmarc (get well soon, Marc), a number of well-known tennis, cricket and football athletes have teamed up to show their support.

How a Single Photograph Thwarted One of the Most Heinous Cheats in Soccer History

Photography and sports are easy bedfellows. As wonderful as it is to watch a goal unfold before your eyes on television, it's just as powerful to see a tack-sharp photograph of the look of dismay on the goalie's face as the ball soars past his or her outstretched arm.

But sports photography isn't just for capturing dramatic moments; sometimes it can affect the course of sports history, as was the case in 1989, after one of the most controversial games in the history of football.

A Look Back at 2 of the Most Iconic Photos in Soccer History

With the World Cup in full swing, CNN Digital's director of photographer, Simon Barnett, has his hands full. Each day of the cup, his job is to look through somewhere in the neighborhood of 10,000 images and decide which make the cut.

In this short video above, he explains what separates the amazing images from the great-but-not-good-enough crowd, and takes us through what it is that made two iconic soccer photographs so iconic.

Purdue Football Team is Crowdsourcing Its Helmet Design Using Photos of Fans

Hey @LifeAtPurdue.. buy a VIP card by 6/10 and get a photo of yourself on the @BoilerFootball helmet next season! pic.twitter.com/LFjz0y5gCt

— Purdue Athletics (@PurdueSports) June 4, 2014

In an effort to increase ticket sales and get fans more involved, Purdue University has announced that they will be designing a new helmet for the football team that involves crowd-sourcing photos of fans to insert into the logo.

How I Shot a Photo of Johnny Manziel for the Cover of ESPN The Magazine

With the college football season winding down, I had the assignment of covering the last Texas A&M home game. The last game I was available to shoot was the second to last home game against Sam Houston State University. This game was just a week after A&M upset the Alabama Roll Tide in Alabama, and Johnny Manziel was instantly catapulted into the rare position of becoming a freshman Heisman finalist.

NBC’s Bullet Time Replay Rigs: How They Work and What You Can Expect

A couple of days ago, we shared the news that NBC's Sunday Night Football was going to show you pro football like you've never seen it before: in bullet time. Details were a bit thin, but it looked like a 24-camera bullet time rig would be installed in each end zone, providing Matrix-like replays that would do their best to blow your mind.

As it turns out, the technology is called 'freeD' and was developed by Replay Technologies. And Patrick Myles of Teledyne DALSA (the company providing the 4K cameras for the system) got in touch with us to share some of the juicy details, which we now get to pass along to you.

BTS: Shooting Portraits of the 2013 South Carolina Gamecocks Football Team

Earlier this year, photographer James Quantz Jr. got the opportunity to shoot the official photos for the 2013 South Carolina Gamecocks football team. So, at 6 o'clock one morning, he and his assistant found themselves at Williams Brice Stadium preparing to take the photos that will grace the teams posters, programs and tickets for the next calendar year.

As an added bonus, Dust of the Ground production company from Columbia, SC tagged along and put together this behind the scenes video that shows Quantz at work with the players and staff.

Spinning Image Stabilization Gets Smooth High-Flying View from a Football Cam

Kris Kitani, a postdoctoral research fellow at Carnegie Mellon University, has developed a unique type of image stabilization that can actually transform the footage from a camera attached to the side of a spinning football from nausea inducing, to smooth fly over.

The video at the top shows the footage he collected when he attached a GoPro to the side of a football. On the left you have the un-altered version, and on the right the version with his software applied.

Sports Illustrated Magazine Accused of Manipulating College Football Photo

Last week, Sports Illustrated magazine published the above photograph by US Presswire photographer Matthew Emmons. Found in the "Leading Off" section, the photo shows the Baylor Bears football team celebrating after their upset victory over the #2 ranked Kansas State Wildcats.

The image has many people talking, not because of the unlikely event that it captures, but because it appears to be heavily manipulated. And it's not just the fact that the picture looks like it passed through an HDR program, but that the Baylor football players didn't wear green jerseys during that game. They wore black.