exposure

This Camera Will Capture a 1,000-Year Exposure That Ends in 3015 for History’s Slowest Photo

Jonathon Keats wants to set a world record in photography that he won't live long enough to see. Nor will his children, or his children's children for many generations. It's a project that won't complete for a millennium.

Keats plans to capture the world's slowest photograph, a 1,000-year-long exposure of the city of Tempe, Arizona, that will be finished in the Spring of 3015.

Video: How to Effectively Capture Realistic-Looking HDR Images

There are many of us who sigh at hearing the dreaded acronym, HDR. Oftentimes we associate it with oversaturated, cartoon-like compositions put together from half a dozen worth of frames. But that’s not the only way to approach HDR. As with everything, it’s a variable, not definitive.

In the above video, Washington DC-based photographer Tim Cooper shows off how to effectively capture an HDR image. And he does so in such a manner that it replicates what the human eye sees, without over-processing as we all too often see.

Exposure: A New Web Service for Creating Beautiful Photo Narratives

The key to creating a good photo-based service is to fill a need that isn't being filled by any other app or website -- a task increasingly difficult as more and more players enter the market. Still, once in a while someone stumbles on an idea that is just the right mix of concepts to create a service really worth your while, and Exposure seems to be just that.

Review: Alien Skin Software’s Exposure 5 is a Solid Film Emulation Program

Alien Skin Software's Exposure 5 is a starting point for building stylish and creative photos that will impress even the harshest of critics. With hundreds of ideas to pick, layer and build upon there's really no limit to what you can make. Opening an image for the first time in Exposure 5 may prove a little overwhelming with the vast array of filters there are to tinker with. Everything from a subtle film look still available at your local shop to the original daguerreotype feel. It is impressive to say the least.

Strange Exposure Differences Between the Nikon D600 and Other DSLRs

Gear reviewer Sohail Mamdani over at BorrowLenses was testing the Canon 6D and Nikon D600 last week by shooting nighttime photos of San Francisco Bay, when he discovered something strange: the DSLRs exposed the scene differently even when all the settings were identical in full manual. The photograph above was captured using the D600 at f/8, 30s, and ISO 100 (in JPEG mode).

Olympus ex-CEO-Turned-Whistleblower Writes a Book About the Scandal

It was almost exactly one year ago that Olympus fired then-CEO Michael Woodford and started a chain of events that culminated in one of the largest financial scandals in Japanese history. Woodford received an incredible amount of international attention for his role in the saga, since he was one of the highest ranking executives ever to turn into a whistleblower.

He may have lost his $8-million-a-year job, but he likely won't ever need another: in addition to settling for a reported $15.5 million over the breakup, Woodford is also cashing in by writing a book that offers his account of what transpired.

Apple to Use Face Detection for Exposure Metering and Snappy Autofocus

Face detection has become the snapshot photographer's invaluable assistant in ensuring tack-sharp faces, but soon it'll be able to add two more job responsibilities to its resume: exposure metering and speedier autofocus. Two patents recently awarded to Apple show that future iOS cameras (perhaps the next iPhone?) will have standard camera features that rely much more on face detection technology. The first patent, titled "Dynamic exposure metering based on face detection", allows the camera to automatically select faces as the primary target for metering. In more difficult situations -- group shots or people standing in front of a crowd, for example -- the camera will use factors such as "head proximity" to select the primary subject.

A Man Can’t Live on Image Credit Alone

So, from time to time, I receive requests to use my images for various purposes — like on a blog or a pamphlet or a calendar or the side of a zeppelin or for a urinal cake. Typically, if they are nice and they’re not going to be making a load of cash off where they’d like to use my image then I’ll let them use it as long as they give me credit. I’m especially generous with environmental interests and non-profits and ice cream manufacturers offering vouchers for all-you-can-eat tours.

But then there are the chumps (and chumpettes) who will be making a substantial amount of money off of the use of my image and I send them packing unless they pony up a fair amount of money. The latest version of this repetitive saga really got caught all up in my craw and so I felt the need to write a bit about it.