explosion

Rapatronic Camera: An Atomic Blast Shot at 1/100,000,000th of a Second

This is a photo of an atomic bomb milliseconds after detonation, shot by Harold ‘Doc’ Edgerton in 1952 through his Rapatronic (Rapid Action Electronic) Camera.

The photo was shot at night through a 10 foot lens, situated 7 miles away from the blast, atop a 75 foot tower. Edgerton systematically turned on and off magnetic fields acting as the camera’s shutter, as opposed to a conventional, mechanical close.

How fast was the magnetic field shutter? 1/100,000,000th of a second.

Capturing High-Speed Photographs of Exploding Wires

Contrary to what you might think, exploding wires are actually a fairly common photographic subject. Although cat bearding probably has it beat in terms of sheer volume, in the world of science, capturing photographs of wires turning into plasma is an often-attempted experiment.

But even though there is a lot of imagery of wires exploding out there, electrical engineer Patrick Herd's most recent experiment sought to capture the phenomenon in a unique way.

Webcam Captures Volcano Explosion and Shockwave in a Time-Lapse Video

Located the Mexican state of Puebla, Popocatépetl is the second highest peak in Mexico and an active volcano -- a really active volcano. It's one of the most lively ones in the country of Mexico, with over 15 major eruptions on record since 1519 and plenty of smaller explosions through the years.

Yesterday, Popocatépetl experienced another powerful explosion as the top "popped off" to relieve the pressure within. A webcam pointed at the peak was able to capture the whole thing, and the video above shows what the explosion and resulting shockwave look like in time-lapse.

Epic Pictures of the Sakurajima Volcano Erupting in Japan

The Sakurajima volcano in southern Japan has been quite active so far in 2013, and photographer Martin Rietze recently traveled to the site to document the eruptions through photographs. His images capture smoke billowing out of the crater, lava exploding in trails of orange light, and lightning flashing back and forth inside the dark ash cloud.

BTS: Shooting Portraits of Models Being Hit with Colorful Powder

Photographer Philippe Echaroux tells us that he recently completed a photo shoot for a series he calls, "The Pigment Party". Echaroux's idea was to capture studio-lit portraits of models posing serenely amidst explosions of colorful powders. After covering the studio with tarps, hanging up a black backdrop, and setting up his lighting, Echaroux had his assistants toss pigment powders of various colors onto the model's face.

The behind-the-scenes video above offers a look at how it all went down.

Photos of Terrible Explosions Frozen Serenely in Mid-Air

New Zealand-based photographer Geoffrey H. Short has an ongoing series titled Towards Another (Big Bang) Theory that explores "the relationship between terror and the sublime" with images of large explosions frozen in midair. Short hired film industry special effects technicians to create the "big bangs" using fossil fuel mixed with gunpowder.