doubleexposure

Creative Photos of Imaginary Inventions that Will ‘Save the Universe’

Photographer Jan Von Holleben specializes in imaginary awesomeness, creating scenes that whisk you away to a different place where random objects can be used to turn dreams into reality.

For his most recent project, however, he and his friends set about doing something even more difficult than bringing 'Dreams of Flying' to life: they're trying to save the universe... with imaginary machines, of course.

Ethereal Double Exposures Merge Digital Glitches with Analog Street Photography

San Francisco-based photographer and self-proclaimed super nerd Doctor Popular -- the same one that made this film canister valentines day card back in February -- started off his photographic career with an iPhone. Unlike many photographers, he moved backwards, eventually purchasing a film camera "strictly out of curiosity" at a yard sale and shifting his focus more and more to film.

His most recent endeavor, Glitch Double Exposures, mixes the two worlds of digital and analog by combining street photos with photos of purposely glitched images into ethereal double exposures.

Tutorial: Shooting Double Exposures with a Canon 5D Mark III

Cameras today have many extra functions that are often buried in menus and forgotten. Last year, I bought the Canon 5D Mark III and, after a few months, realized that there were some interesting features I had never played with. After figuring out that there was a way to do in-camera double exposures, I immediately started experimenting. At first it was very hit and miss. (I still hadn’t read the manual.)

Major Cities Around the World Captured in 8-Second Double Exposure Photos

One method for capturing "multiple exposure" photographs is to shoot a long exposure photograph of a scene with your camera pointed in different directions while the shutter is open. Photographer Nicolas Ruel uses this concept in an ambitious project that has taken him around the world. Titled 8 Seconds, the series features famous cities around the world (e.g. New York City, Tokyo, Beijing, Barcelona) captured in surreal multi-exposure photographs.

Double Exposure: A Clever Photo Prank From Half a Century Ago

When the engineering students and staff of King's College in London gathered together to take a faculty portrait, the photographer used an old camera that panned from left to right in order to capture an extremely long panorama of the entire group in one frame. It worked a bit like the panorama features on modern smartphones: start the exposure on one side of the frame, and then gradually sweep the camera across the scene while everyone in the frame stays as still as possible.

People vs. Places: Double Exposures by Two Photographers on One Roll of Film

People vs. Places is a creative collaborative photo project by photographers Timothy Burkhart and Stephanie Bassos. They create double exposure photos by each shooting the same roll of film, but with a neat twist: they each stick to a theme:

This double exposure project allows us to step back from having full control of the image making process and trust in one another while allowing coincidences to happen naturally on film. Stephanie exposes a full roll of 35mm film of only "people," and Timothy reloads the film again into the same camera, to imprint only "places" and locations to the same roll. These images are all the end result of our ongoing series and are unedited negatives straight from the camera.

Thus, each image shows a randomly created clash between a photo of a person and a photo of a place.

Create Beautiful Surreal Photographs by Stacking Your Film Negatives

We've shared a number of examples of surreal images created using multiple exposure techniques or by combining images using Photoshop, but did you know that you can also create beautiful images by stacking actual film negatives? Photographer Laina Briedis did some experiments with 35mm film stacking, and achieved some stunning results. She combined photos of stars and sky with pictures of people, creating images that look like they were plucked from someone's dreams.

Striped Double Exposure Photos Created Entirely In-Camera

The photographs in Isabel M. Martínez's Quantum Blink project look like they were stitched together using Photoshop, but they were actually all created in-camera. She writes,

The photographs in Quantum Blink are composed of two exposures taken instants apart. The striped pattern is the result of masks placed in-camera, this feature allows me to blend two images together and at the same time keep them from fully fusing onto one another. Each photograph holds a brief sense of continuity, almost like an animation, slightly cinematographic. Though they provide a notion of movement and progression, their beginning and end is ambiguous and indistinguishable.

Double Exposures of Nature Blooming Through Portraits of Young Women

Buried inside photographer Jon Duenas' extensive portfolio are a set of double exposures that seem to focus on the theme of nature blooming through portraits of young women. Sometimes the technique itself is novel; such was the case with the mix of light paining and bullet time we posted yesterday. But that doesn't mean that a photography technique that has been used time and again can't still produce fresh, unique, and inspirational results.

Surreal Double Exposure Photographs Created Entirely In-Camera

"Double Exposure" is a series of surreal photos by Dan Mountford creating by exposing single frames of film twice. While they look like photo-manipulations done with fancy image editing programs, Mountford relies on fancy camerawork for the images, leaving only the color additions/modifications to post-processing.