documentaryphotography

The Photographic Phases of Depicting COVID-19

In many parts of the U.S. the reality of social distancing policies have only been in place for about a month. Yet during that time and the few weeks that preceded it, photographers have already churned through a number of phases to document and depict the outbreak.

Using an iPhone to Document Climate Change in Antarctica

Portrait and documentary photographer Manfredi Gioacchini recently embarked on an expedition to cover as much of Antarctica as possible, documenting its beauty and raising awareness about the impacts of climate change on the White Continent. And he's doing much of it with an iPhone.

US Filmmaker Arrested While Documenting Pipeline Protest in Canada

US documentary filmmaker Melissa Cox had a run-in with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) this week while trying to document an indigenous protest in British Columbia. Despite the fact that she is a member of the press, the RCMP chose to arrest Cox, allegedly using "undue force" and tampering with her camera equipment in the aftermath.

Photographer Captures Eerie Images of Venice Underwater

This past November, Venice experienced its worst flooding in over 50 years, prompting the government to declare a state of emergency. But while news of the flooding caused thousands to cancel their travel plans, photographer Natalia Elena Massi did the exact opposite: she packed her bags and drove to Venice.

Are Street and Documentary Photography Art?

I think the question of whether something is or is not "art" is a bit disingenuous, often used more as a tool for gatekeeping than true analysis or critique. There is no objective standard for what makes something enjoyable as a piece of art, whether that's a photograph, music, sculpture, or a blade of grass in a field.

Lessons Learned After 250 Documentary Photography Assignments

Recently I hit a milestone in my photographer's career: I've accomplished 250 paid assignments. It took me ten years and half a million frames to get there. I thought it's a decent reason to reflect a little bit on what has been done and what the journey feels like.

This Photo Was Not Staged: Wedding Photojournalism vs Photojournalism

This is an unposed, naturally caught moment at Rachael and Carl’s wedding at The Vineyard in Stockcross, Berkshire. It’s recently won a couple of awards from This is Reportage and the Wedding Photojournalist Association. It’s a striking image, and drew some criticism that it must be staged, or was not photojournalism. So I thought I’d explain why I believe this is wedding photojournalism, and how I came about taking this image.

The Ethics of Photojournalism

From time to time when I read about Street Photography, I hear the opinion that street photographers exploit people on the street by taking their picture without asking. This opinion raises some valid questions about the ethics of Street Photography, but also shows the double standards we follow in the media.

Creating Environmental Portraits During a Protest

After seeing Gina LeVay's work from the March on Washington I wanted to try something similar here in Boston during a demonstration. I loved the feel of separating the subject with beautiful portrait light juxtaposed with the darkened ever changing crowd behind them.

Photo Essay: Makeshift Basketball Courts Across the Philippines

Basketball was invented in 1890 in America. By 1900, it was already in the Philippines where the locals had embraced the sport with open arms. Over a century later, one photographer is on a quest to capture just how important this sport is to the Filipino people.

Documenting Ice Road Trucking in Siberia, a Terrifying Assignment

Photojournalists are used to risking life and limb to capture their subject, but how many have had to risk freezing to death in Siberia? Photojournalist Amos Chapple has, and he recently told the story behind this "scariest assignment of my life" in a photo essay that'll have you literally holding your breath.

It Never Hurts To Ask: How Great Photo Projects are Born

Behind the lens, I am no longer Ben Helton, married father-of-2 living in the South. Camera in hand, I become invisible and free: a blank canvas in attendance to take in and document the experience around me as it unfolds.