dancing

These Cranes Were Caught Dancing In Sync with Ed Sheeran’s ‘Perfect’

Ilene Karlsberg-Gerstein of Clermont, Florida, was driving down the road last Wednesday when she came across two sandhill cranes dancing with each other. After she pulled out her phone to shoot video of the scene, Karlsberg-Gerstein found that the cranes were dancing beautifully to the song playing in her car, "Perfect" by Ed Sheeran.

Wedding Photographers Show Off Their Dance Moves with the Bride and Groom

Here's something you don't see very often at weddings: a choreographed dance involving the photographers. At a recent wedding in Albania, the bride and groom came up with the idea of doing an organized dance with their sharply-dressed photographers and videographers to open up the dance floor. You can watch the 3-minute routine in the video above.

Dancelapse: One Dance Performed Over One Hundred Days

Timelapse projects involving one photo or video per day have seen a surge in popularity in recent years ever since videos such as Noah Kalina's everyday went viral. Matt Bray wanted to do something similar to Kalina's project... but different. He set up a camera and captured himself doing the exact same dance in his room for 100 days, and then turned it into one impressive time-lapse dance.

Dance-Lapse: Woman Uses Her Camera to Capture a Year of Learning to Dance

How good can you get at something in 365 days? If you're former Microsoft exec Karen Cheng, pretty darn good. Her goal was to learn to dance in one year, and she spent that year documenting the experience and showing her progress right up to her final impressive performance in a San Francisco subway station.

Beautiful Light Painting Photos Created With Dancers and Athletes

Combining light painting with sports that involve long fluid motion is a match made in photography heaven that companies like Red Bull have already taken advantage of to create some pretty spectacular shots.

Photographers Joanna Jask├│lska and Zach Ancell both had similar ideas, and their resulting photo series -- Breakdance Baby! and Trajectory -- are both unique examples of the awesome photography you can create when you mix dance, athletics and light painting.

Dancers Among Us: Photos of People Dancing Through Life

In 2009, NYC-based headshot photographer Jordan Matter began photographing professional dancers performing moves in and around New York City for a project titled "Dancers Among Us". When the photographs went viral online, Matter began taking similar photographs in major cities around the world. The photographs show dancers leaping and holding poses in all kinds of environments and situations, from a picnic in the park to workers shoveling snow.

Shooting Studio-Lit Portraits of a Dancer in Motion at 14FPS Using a Canon 1D X

The 14 frame per second continuous shooting speed of the Canon 1D X DSLR probably isn't a feature you'd associate with studio-lit portraiture, but that's exactly what Australian fashion photographer Georges Antoni demonstrates in the short clip above. Using the Broncolor Scoro for stobe lighting, Antoni unleashes the full FPS potential of the camera in order to capture a model dancing in as many still frames as possible.

Dancing Around the World with a Camera in Hand

Seattle-based techie Matt Harding became an Internet celebrity back in 2005 after a video of him dancing in various locations around the world went viral online. Now he's back again with a new 2012 edition that's sure to go just as viral. Harding spent months traveling to tens of countries around the world, capturing short clips of himself dancing with thousands of people. The project is titled, "Where the Hell is Matt?".

Sound Painting Photographs with Paint and Speakers

Photographer Martin Klimas, whose porcelain figurine photos we shared yesterday, has a series of photographs that look like 3D Jackson Pollock paintings. He spent six months photographing portraits of sound by playing music through a speaker that's crowned with paint. Klimas dials up the volume and then photographs the paint coming alive from vibrations caused by the sound waves.