charges

Deputy Who Shot Photog ‘Reasonably’ Thought Tripod Was Gun: Lawyers

In September 2017, an Ohio newspaper photojournalist was shot by a deputy at a traffic stop when a tripod was mistaken for a gun. Now lawyers are arguing that the deputy "reasonably" believed that the tripod was a gun and that the photographer's "negligence" may have led to the shooting. The state has also decided that the deputy won't face any charges for the incident.

Man Charged with Felony Assault After Nearly Running Over Photographer

Los Angeles-based photographer Alex Stone was shooting a car on a desolate public road in Southern California this past weekend when he was confronted by an angry man who demanded that the photo crew get off his "driveway." Stone's recording of the confrontation went viral, and the man in the video has now been arrested and charged with felony assault with a deadly weapon.

NYPD Helicopter Narrowly Avoids Crashing Into Two Camera Drones

Update: Initial reports that the 'drones' flew at the helicopter may not be entirely accurate. Click here to read our followup coverage.

Earlier this week, two drones narrowly avoided a collision with a New York Police Department’s helicopter just over the George Washington Bridge. It took aversion maneuvers by the quick-thinking helicopter pilot to ensure no collision took place. But just because there wasn’t any critical harm done doesn’t mean the individuals behind the reckless drones are getting off free.

Charges Dropped Against Motorcyclist Who Filmed Plainclothes Cop

Charges have been dropped against Anthony Graber, a motorcyclist who filmed a plainclothes Maryland State Trooper during a traffic stop and uploaded the video to YouTube. According to the Baltimore Sun,

Judge Emory A Pitt Jr. tossed all the charges filed against Anthony Graber, leaving only speeding and other traffic violations, and most likely sparing him a trial that had been scheduled for Oct. 12. The judge ruled that Maryland's wire tap law allows recording of both voice and sound in areas where privacy cannot be expected. He ruled that a police officer on a traffic stop has no expectation of privacy.

"Those of us who are public officials and are entrusted with the power of the state are ultimately accountable to the public," the judge wrote. "When we exercise that power in public fora, we should not expect our actions to be shielded from public observation."