cellphone

How the First Camera Phone Photo Was Shot in 1997

Believe it or not, there was a time when photo sharing was a lot slower than in the age of digital photography, smartphone cameras, Instagram, and Snapchat. In the mid-1900s, instantaneously capturing and sharing photos online was unheard of. Then in 1997, the first camera phone was born.

Photographer Pays a Touching Tribute to Her Elderly Dog

When photographer Catherine Panebianco noticed her beloved dog Benny begin to show the signs of old age, she did what any photographer and dog lover might do: she picked up a camera. She began chronicling the last year of Benny's life, photo by intimate photo.

African Migrants Looking for Cell Signal by Moonlight Wins World Press Photo 2013

Last year's World Press Photo of the Year award went to a controversial image of a funeral procession in Gaza, City. This year's winning photo doesn't strike the same tragic nerve as last year's, and yet it makes such a powerful statement about technology and our global community that we immediately understood why it took home the top prize.

Nokia Unleashes a Game-Changing 41-Megapixel “PureView” Camera Phone

Nokia dropped a bomb on the cameraphone market today by introducing its new 808 PureView phone -- a phone that is capable of capturing 41-megapixel photos. The native resolution of the phone (16:9) produces 38-megapixel images measuring 7152x5368. The phone also allows you to capture 5-megapixel images by condensing every seven pixels into one, which dramatically reduces noise and improves image quality. Other features include a 4-inch screen, 16GB of built-in storage, a Carl Zeiss f/2.4 lens, lossless digital zoom (i.e. cropping a photo out of the giant image), and HD video recording. It'll hit store shelves in May at a price of €450 (~$600).

A Look At How Much the iPhone Camera Has Improved

Photographer Lisa Bettany has an interesting post over at Camera+ comparing the iPhone 4S camera to the cameras on each of the previous versions (and a couple other cameras as well). It's an interesting look at how much cell phone cameras have improved since the original iPhone was announced at the beginning of 2007.

A Couple of Scenes in ‘The Avengers’ Were Shot with the iPhone 4

We've shared before that the Canon 5D Mark II was used for scenes in Captain America and Iron Man 2, but if you think that's crazy, get this: the upcoming movie 'The Avengers', which features an entire team of Marvel superheros, contains scenes shot with the iPhone 4. The movie's cinematographer Seamus McGarvey tells IFTN,

The beauty of photography or cinema is that you make every choice based on the content at hand. On The Avengers, I did a couple of shots on the iPhone and they are in the movie. In fact, they are in the trailer! I understand that sometimes there is no choice and you have to go for the cheapest option, but if you are limited for choice, you can still make poignant decisions that will effect the look of the film.

Assuming he was using an iPhone 4 rather than the recently announced iPhone 4S, the scenes were captured at just 720p and 30fps.

This Photo May Have Been Taken with the Upcoming iPhone 5

What you see here may be the first leaked photograph shot with the upcoming iPhone 5. The EXIF data claims it was shot with the iPhone 4, but other EXIF details indicate otherwise. Although the leaked image was cropped, the original size of the image was 3264x2448 (roughly 8MP), the rumored resolution found on the next iPhone. The lens info was recorded as "4.3mm f/2.4", more similar to a point-and-shoot than then 3.85mm f/2.8 lens found on the iPhone 4. Finally, the geotag info in the photo shows it was taken at 37.33216667,-122.03033333 -- the location of Apple's headquarters. Check out the full-res file with EXIF intact here.

How to Scan Film Using Your Phone or Tablet Computer

We shared a couple weeks ago that it's possible to scan film using an ordinary flatbed scanner and a DIY cardboard adapter, but did you know you can also use a large-screen cell phone or tablet computer to provide the necessary backlighting? All you need is a way to turn a large portion of the screen entirely white (e.g. a "flashlight" app). Simply place the device facedown over the film on the scanner, and scan it with the cover open.