branding

ZEISS brand 1

Carl Zeiss Rebranded, Now Just ‘ZEISS’

Famed and well-respected optical systems manufacturer Carl Zeiss is taking a step forward to create a "more consistent" image of the brand -- a brand which, up until now, has been known as Carl Zeiss AG.

According to a blog post from earlier today, Carl Zeiss AG will simply go by the name ZEISS moving forward. The company is, of course, named after its optician founder.

Cyber-shot Branding May Return to Sony Phones Alongside Serious Specs

Sony has used its "Cyber-shot" brand for digital cameras since 1996, and from 2008 to 2009 the company also slapped the brand on its Sony Ericsson camera phones. Now, with the smartphone industry investing heavily in camera technologies, Sony may soon be reintroducing the brand to its Xperia smartphones in order to compete against other photo-focused phones.

Cameras and Film in White, With All Visual Branding Removed

New York City-based photographer and brand strategist Andrew Miller has finished his project Brand Spirit (which we featured earlier this year), a photo-a-day effort to capture a well-known product in a way that's completely devoid of visual branding. For 100 days, Miller painted an object completely white and then photographed it on a white backdrop. Of the 100 objects he chose, three of them are related to photography: a Polaroid camera (#65), a Canon FTb (#86), and a roll of Kodak film (#39).

Photos Documenting the Illegal Use of Olympic Branding

The 2012 London Olympics is pretty strict about how the Games' branding is used, prohibiting the unauthorized use of everything from the Olympic symbol to the word "Olympic". Enforcing the rules is another story, as businesses both near and far use Olympic branding extensively to promote their own interests. Photographer Craig Atkinson recently decided to start a project documenting illegal uses in London through a photo project titled Illegal Olympics.

Household Objects with Visual Branding Completely Removed

Brand Spirit is a new photo project by NYC-based branding strategist Andrew Miller, who writes,

Every day for 100 days, I will paint one branded object white, removing all visual branding, reducing the object to its purest form. Each object may be purchased for less than $10, something I own, something another person gives me, or something I find.

See if you can identify each of the objects despite their lack of branding.