bomb

Photoflash Bombs Were Once Used to Light Nighttime Aerial Photos

Digital cameras can see in color in near darkness these days, but decades ago, there were very different solutions for capturing usable photos at night. One example is the photoflash bomb, a special type of bomb that was designed specifically to explode in midair and illuminate the world below for aerial photos.

Meet The Man Who Photographed the Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima

On August 6th, 1945 Russell Gackenbach captured a historic, horrifying event on his personal camera. From the bowels of an Air Force bomber, he snapped two pictures of the first atomic bombing when a 9,000-pound uranium-235 bomb named 'Little Boy' obliterated the city of Hiroshima, Japan.

It Looks Like Someone’s Solargraphy Camera Just Got Blown Up by an Atlanta Bomb Squad

If you're looking to do a solargraphy project by leaving a pinhole camera in a place for months, a bridge above a busy freeway is not a smart location choice.

Someone doing this caused a bomb scare in Virginia back in 2013, and it looks like the exact same thing caused a ridiculously huge commotion in Atlanta, Georgia this morning. A busy freeway was shut down in both directions, and a bomb squad was called out to detonate the device.

Haunting Photographs of Nagasaki Taken One Day After the Atomic Bomb Dropped

This week, 24 incredible, powerful, haunting photographs will be going up on the auction block at Bonhams in New York. These are photographs that are newly-discovered, and many of them have never been seen before as they were taken with a faulty camera and never made it in front of the public eye.

They are photographs of Nagasaki, Japan, taken by celebrated Japanese military photographer Yosuke Yamahata the day after an atomic bomb was dropped on it and Hiroshima.

Bomb Squad Called to Bridge to Deal with a Solargraphy Pinhole Camera

Solargraphy involves using a pinhole camera to shoot extremely long exposures of scenes. Photographers who engage in it often leave their cameras fixed to outdoor locations for months or years in order to capture the path of the sun across the sky.

Waiting until the whole exposure is complete before seeing if an image turned out is painful enough, but there's another major difficulty that can cause practitioners pain: the cameras are sometimes mistaken for bombs.