beijing

Error Causes Mass of Light Show Drones to Tumble Out of the Sky

Drones have been used as an accompaniment to fireworks or as wholesale replacements for several years and most have started and concluded without issue. But during a show in Shanghai on June 14, something went terribly awry and caused a mass of drones to unexpectedly tumble out of the sky.

Charlie Cole, Photojournalist Behind Iconic Tank Man Photo, Dies at 64

It has been two weeks of constant loss in the photo industry. First we lost Peter Lindbergh, then Robert Frank, and now Charlie Cole, the American photojournalist behind one of the four iconic Tank Man photos taken during the infamous 1989 Tiananmen Square protests in Beijing, has also passed away. Cole was 64 years old.

Trey Ratcliff’s Trip to China Included Drone Confiscation & a Chinese Detention Center

Pushing the boundaries on where you should and shouldn't use a drone is scary enough in most situations. But "most situations" don't seem to be daring enough for noted travel photographer Trey Ratcliff.

Detailing his experience over on his blog, Stuck In Customs, Ratcliff tells the tale of how his endeavors to use a drone in the Forbidden City of Beijing earned him some time with Chinese authorities in a detention center.

Out With the Old, In With the New: Photos that Show the Modernization of China

Photographer Christopher Domakis has photographed both sides of the urban coin in China. Through two unrelated photo series, Hutong and Microcosm, he has managed to juxtapose the quiet closeness of the narrow Hutong alley neighborhoods of Beijing with the hustle and bustle of the rapidly growing urban developments in many of China's biggest cities.

Time-Slice Composite Photo Captures the Changing Air Quality in Beijing

A neat way to capture the passage of time is to photograph one scene multiple times throughout a day, slice up the resulting photos, and then combine them into a single composite image showing all the different hours as slices. In the past we've shown examples of this technique done in cities and with sunsets.

Chinese photographer Wei Yao of Reuters used this same concept, but instead of shooting photos over a number of hours, his image spans days. Instead of focusing on the passage of time, his image highlights Beijing's serious pollution problem.

Beijing Silvermine: Rescuing Discarded Negatives from Illegal Recycling Centers

For his most recent project, French photography collector and editor Thomas Sauvin has been spending his time digging though illegal silver recycling centers in Beijing. He's doing this because buried within piles of X-Rays and CD-ROMs are hidden millions of discarded film negatives that Sauvin is intent on preserving.

Photographs of “Invisible Man” Blending into Beijing Locations

After his Beijing studio was destroyed in 2005, artist Liu Bolin (AKA "The Invisible Man") began a project titled "Hiding in the City" that show him blending into various locations around Beijing. The photographs aren't Photoshopped -- Bolin carefully has his body painted to blend in with each landscape. TIME writes,

Each image requires meticulous planning and execution: as both artist and performer, Bolin directs the photographer on how to compose each scene before entering the frame. Once situated, he puts on his Chinese military uniform, which he wears for all of his Invisible Man photographs, and, with the help of an assistant and painter, is painted seamlessly into the scene. This process can sometimes take up to ten hours with Bolin having to stand perfectly still. Although the end result of Bolin’s process is the photograph, the tension between his body and the landscape is itself a manifestation of China’s incredible social and physical change. [#]